Select British Classics, Volume 4

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J. Conrad, 1804 - English literature
 

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Page 117 - And by opposing end them ? — To die — to sleep — No more ; and, by a sleep, to say we end The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to — 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die — to sleep ; — To sleep ! perchance to dream : — ay, there's the rub ; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause...
Page 117 - No traveller returns, puzzles the will ; And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all ; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought ; And enterprizes of great pith and moment, With this regard, their currents turn away/ And lose the name of action.
Page 94 - And Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand ; and all the women went out after her with timbrels and with dances. And Miriam answered them, Sing ye to the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously ; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea.
Page 124 - As when to them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past Mozambic, off at sea north-east winds blow Sabean odours from the spicy shore Of Araby the Blest; with, such delay Well pleased they slack their course, and many a league Cheer'd with the grateful smell old Ocean smiles...
Page 151 - In these plays almost all the characters are good, and exceedingly generous; they are lavish enough of their tin money on the stage; and though they want humour, have abundance of sentiment and feeling. If they happen to have faults or foibles, the spectator is taught not only to pardon, but to applaud them, in consideration of the goodness of their hearts...
Page 134 - Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners' legs, The cover of the wings of grasshoppers, <*> The traces of the smallest spider's web, The collars of the moonshine's...
Page 153 - ... into their mouths, give them mighty good hearts, very fine clothes, furnish a new set of scenes, make a pathetic scene or two, with a sprinkling of tender melancholy conversation through the whole, and there is no doubt but all the ladies will cry, and all the gentlemen applaud.
Page 152 - ... have abundance of sentiment and feeling. If they happen to have faults or foibles, the spectator is taught not only to pardon, but to applaud them in consideration of the goodness of their hearts ; so that folly, instead of being ridiculed, is commended, and the comedy aims at touching our passions, without the power of being truly pathetic.
Page 109 - ... mercies, O my God, My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view, I'm lost In wonder, love and praise. O how shall words with equal warmth The gratitude declare That glows within my ravish'd heart? But Thou canst read it there. Thy Providence my life sustain'd, And all my wants redrest; When in the silent womb I lay, And hung upon the breast.
Page 108 - He spake; and, to confirm his words, out-flew Millions of flaming swords, drawn from the thighs Of mighty Cherubim ; the sudden blaze Far round illumined Hell.

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