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Schmitz and Zampt's Classica: Suries Continued.

Prom A. W. Pike, Esu., Kennebunk, Me. December 14, 1849. 1 have examined with much care and high satisfaction, the first five volumes of ye dition of Drs. Schmitz and Zumpt's classical series. The plan and execution of the ser are excellent. The notes appended to the several authors evince fully the sound judge ment and accurate criticism of the learned editors. They are sufficiently copious to meas the wants of the student, without, at the same time, by their fulness, encouraging habits af indolence I have, for more than thirty years, been constantly engaged in teaching the classics, and I have not seen any edition of the Latin authors, usually read in o'r academies, which I could commeud só contidently, as the one you are publishing.

From E. EVERETT, Esq., New Orleans, December 14, 1849. All these publications are valuable acquisitions to our classical and school libraries. am particularly pleased with the Virgil; the notes are a store of learning; thes emiah the student with such hints on the manners and customs of the Romans as cannot fal to serve as important aids to the study of Roman history, at the same time that they throw Daw light on the text of the great poet. They seem to me to be model notes : they are neither so copious us to enable the student to dispense with the exercise of judgment and inste, nor so meagre as to leave difficult passages unexplained.

From HOMAS CHASE, Esq., Cambridge, Mass., September 28, 1849. I take greai pleasure in recommending the various volumes of Schmitz and Zumpt's massical Series, which have appeared in this country, as adınirably adapted for the use 9. schools. The character of the editors is a guarantee of the accuracy of the text and the correctness of the annotations. The notes are prepared with careful scholarship and nice discrimination, and the amount of information given on historical and grammatica) points is sufficient to satisfy the wants of the learner, while it is not so great as to bn prejudicial to his habits of study. We have introduced the editions of Cæsar and of Vir que comprised in this series, into the High School in this city.

From R. B. TSCHUDI, Esq., Norfolk Academy, May 31, 1849. I received the fourth volume of your classical series and take great pleasure in informing you they have been the text-books recommended in this school since their first ap pearance. I have found the text and typographionl execution equal, and in many respecta superior to any other editions that I have seen. But their cheapness is destined to make them take the place of all other school editions. Of course it will take time to assume the place of works already in use, but I believe fully, at no distant day these will be the sole editions in general use.

From A. MORSE, Esq., Nantucket High School, July 20, 1849. After a somewhat minute examination of the same, in which I have compared them, line hy line, with other editions, edited by different gentlemen, which my classes are now reading, I have no hesitation in giving to the series, edited by Drs. Schmitz and Zumpt, a docided preserence to any with which I am acquainted.

From R. H. BALL, Esq., Northumberland Academy, November 28, 1849. This edition of the classics, so far, I greatly prefer to any other I have seen, for the use of schools. It combines the advantages of textua. correctness, cheapness, and pre-emiDART ability in the annotations, three things especially desirable in school books. I har adopted this series, as far as issued, to the exclusion of all others. from the Rev. E. A. DALRYMPLE, Episcopal High School of Virginia, Nocen

ber 27, 1849. I have examined them with some care, and have pleasure in stating that they are iudiciously and carefully prepared for the use of schools and colleges. The notes are the point, and what notes to classical authors should be, not so full as to amount to translation of the text, or so meagre as to give no satisfactory information to the studer As the best evidence of my approval, I would state that it is my purpose to introduce thon, as occasion may arise, into the institution under my direction.

From Z. D. T. KINGSLEY, Esq., West Point, N. Y., November 6, 1848. I am very much pleased with the Cæsar and Virgil, and presume I shall be equally o with the Sallust. I shall adopt these Latin books for my school.

From Pror. A. F. Ross, Bethany College, Virginia, December 7, 1848. My opinion of the Cæsar you have already had expressed, and I will only add that my jaterest in the completion of the series has been enhanced by the volumes which baro forwarded mo. I shall recommend them for adoption as the standerd wurse in it Ostitution

Schmitz and Zumpt's Classical Series--Continuod.

From J. S. BONSALL, Esq., Frederick College, Md., Feb. 5, 1849. have examined thein, and find them on all points what the reputation of the emin ditors leri me to expect froin them, and what they design the books to be.

I know not that I can give you a better proof of the estimation in which I ho u then ban by simply sayin; that I am alreaily using Cæsar and Virgil of the series in my clasun and expect very soon to introduce Sallust.

from Prof. N. L. LINDSLEY, Cumberland University, Tenn., Nov. 22, 1848. Jou very favourably impresred with the merits of Schnitz and Zumpt's classical seria ho fas u my engagenients have permitted me to examine the “ Virgii” and “Sallust,"|

Red to believe thai they are superior to the other editions in common use.
I shail take pleasure in recoiumending them to teachers and students in this vicinity

From Prof. GESSN & Harrison, University of Virginia, Nov. 3, 1848. ! very deridedly approve of the plan of publishing cheap editions of the classics, wita brief notes, for the use of schools, and shall recommend this edition to my friends, as suit able for this object.

From Pror. W. S. TYLER, Amherst College, Mass., Dec. 25, 1848. The notes are pertinent and pithy, as well as accurate and learned, and contrast to preat advantage with some whose chief recommendation is, that they are designed to atone for the indolence of the student by the supererogatory works of the editor.

From John S. Hart, LL. D., Central High School, Philadelphia, Dec. 14, 1848.

I have examined, with much satisfaction, your editions of Virgil and Sallust, being con Lanuations of your reprint of Schmitz and Zumpt's classical series, and take pleasure in renewing the recommendation which I gave to the plan of the series on the appearance of Cæsar, The noles are admirably adapted to the precise wants of the learner, giving in small space all the necessary facilities, without superseding the necessity of diligent and accurate study.

From C. W. EVEREST, Esq., Rectory School, Hamden, Ct., Dec. 7, 1848. From the brief examination I have been able to give them, I feel very much pleased with them, both as regards the execution of your own part of the plan, and also that of your able editors. Such text-books are much needed." Instead of them, we have been mundated with editions, too often wretchedly printed, and more frequently ruined by a multiplicty of notes. Accept my thanks for your kindness in sending me the works, and be sure I shall be happy to adopt them as text-books in my school.

From Wm. B. Ports, Orwigsburg, Pa., Nov. 28, 1848. I have devoted sufficient time to the examination of your editions of Cæsar, Virgil, and Sallust, to enable me to form an estimate

of their respective merits. I do not hesitato to ay that the uniformity and cheapness of the works, with the notes of the learned editor, sufficiently illustrative of the style and sentiments of the authors, and yet not so volumi. vous as to obviate the necessity of careful study on the part of the student, must recommend them to the favourable consideration of those engaged in teaching this interesting branch of literature. We shall certainly adopt this series in the academy.

From WM. GARNETE, Esq., Norfolk, Va., Nov. 20, 1848. I return you my thanks for the copies of Virgil and Sallust sent to me. The profonsor of languages in the Norfolk academy has introduced them in this school, and we think they will be used in all schools, as soon as known to them. I shall recommend them to lihe teachers of my acquaintance,

From Wm. Dennis, Esq., Wilmington, Del., Nov. 11, 1848. I hare received the Cæsar and Virgil of the classical series now in course of publication you and have for some time been using the Cæsar with a class. I am satisfied them we are better school editions of those authors than any others that I have ever roon.

from G. W. MEEKER, Esq., Chicago, Il., Jan. 17, 1849. ! shall be happy to recommend them as the best and most accurate edition of time sosul hane ever seen.

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schmitz and Zumpt’s Classical Series--Continued. KALTSCHMIDT'S LATIN DICTIONARY FOR SCHOOLS.

A SCHOOL DICTIONARY OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE,
IN TWO PARTS, LATIN-ENGLISH AND ENGLISH-LATIN.

BY DR. KALTSCHMIDT.
Formir une large royal 18mo, volume of 850 pages, closely printed in double columns

and strongly bound.-Price, $130.
Also, Part I. Latin English, in one handsome volume, strongly bound, of

nearly 500 pages.-Price, 90 cts.
Part II. English-Latin, nearly 400 pages, bound to match. - Prioo, 75 dia.

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While several valuable and copious Latin Lexicons have within a few years been published in this country, a want has long been felt and acknow. kedged of a good School DictioNARY, which within reasonable coinpass and at a moderate price should present lo the student all the information requisito for his purposes, as elucidated by the most recent investigations, and at the rame time unincumbered with erudition useful only to the advanced scholar, and increasing the size and cost of the work beyond the reach of a large portion of the community. It is with this view especially that the present work has been prepared, and the names of its distinguished authors are a sufficient guarantee that this intention has b en skilfully and accurately carried out.

The present volume has been compiled by Dr. Kaltschmidt, ihe well-known German Lexicographer, from the best Latin Dictionaries now in use through. out Europe, and has been carefully revised by Dr. Leonhard Schmitz. Learned discussions and disquisitions could not be introduced, as incompatible with the objects for which the Dictionary is intended, and because they would have swelled considerably the bulk of the volume. On the other hand, it has been thought advisable to give, as far as possible, the etymology of each word, not only tracing it to its latin or Greek root, but to roots or kindred forms of words occurring in the cognate languages of the great Indo-Germanic family This feature, which distinguishes the present Dictionary from all others, can. not fail to awaken the learner to the interesting fact of the radical identity of many apparently heterogeneous languages, and prepare him at an early stage for the delightful study of comparative philology

The aim of the publishers has been to carry out the author's views as far as possible by the form and arrangement of the volume. The type, though clear and well printed, is small, and the size of the page such as to present an im. mense amount of matter in the compass of a single handsome 18mo. volume, furnished at a price far below what is usual with such works, and thus placing within the reach of the poorest student a neat, convenient, and complete Lexicon, embodying the investigations of the most distinguished scholars of

she age.

UNIFORM WITH SCHMITZ & ZUMPT'S CLASSICAL SERIES.

THE CLASSICAL MANUAL.
AN EPITOME OF ANCIENT GEOGRAPHY, GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY,

ANTIQUITIES, AND CHRONOLOGY.
Chiefly intended for the Use of Schools.
COMPILED BY JAMES 8. S. BAIRD, T.C.D., &c.

In one handsome 18mo. volume, of about 175 pages
Mhe want has long been felt and acknowledged of an epitome, presenting in a modo
rate space and at a low price, such information as is necessary for the proper compre
pension and appreciation of the classical authors most commonly read in our shoolm
The object of the present volume is to supply this want, by affording in the mont, com
genged form, and in such a manner as to admit of its being thoroughly mastered and
retained, all the information respecting classical antiquity which is requisite for tu
warlier stages of study.

6.

BLANCAARD AND LEA'S PUBLICATIONS.

LONG'S CLASSICAL ATLAS.

BLANCHARD & LEA, PHILADELPHIA,

HAVE NOW READY,

AN ATLAS OF CLASSICAL GEOGRAPHY.

Constructed by WILLIAM HUGHES,

AND EDITED

BY GEORGE LONG, (FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES IN THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.) With a Sketch of ANCIENT GEOGRAPHY, and other Additions, by the Ameri.

can Editor. Containing Fifty-two Colored Maps and Plans on Twenty-two large imperial quarto Plates, beautifully engraved on steel in the clearest and most finished style. With an Index of Places. Handsomely half-bound, with cloth sides, in one large volume. Price $3.

LIST OF PLATES, 1. THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE ANCIENTS.- THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOMER

(B. C. 900).—THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HECATÆUS (about B.C. 500).-THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HERODOTUS (about B.C. 440).-THE WORLD ACCORDING TO DEMOCRI• TUS (about B.C. 300). - THE WORLD ACCORDING TO ERATOSTHENES AND STRABO (from about B. C. 200 to A.D. 20). WESTERN EUROPE ACCORDING TO STRABO. THE WORLD ACCORDING TO PTOLEMY (about A. D 160).-INDIA ACCORDING TO PTO

LEMY.-BRITAIN ACCORDING TO PTOLEMI. 2. THE WORLD AS KNOWN TO THE ANCIENTS, WITH THE BOUNDARY OF TUK

PERSIAN EMPIRE UNDER CYRUS. 3. EMPIRE OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT, WITH TUE ADJOINING REGIONS 4. THE PROVINCES OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (A. D. 119). 5. BRITANNIA. 6. GALLIA. 7. HISPANIA. 8. ITALIA (Northern Part). 9. ITALIA (Southern Part).-CORSICA AND SARDINIA. 10. PLAN OF ROME. 11. THE ROMAN TERRITORY AND THE NEIGHBORING COUNTRY, on an enlarged - scale. 12. SICILIA. 13. SYRACUSÆ. -THE BAY OF NAPLES AND ADJACENT PART OF CAM

PANIA.-THE TWO PORTS OF BRUNDUSIUM. 14. MACEDONIA, THRACIA, ILLYRICUM, AND THE PROVINCES OF THE

MIDDLE AND LOWER DANUBE. 15. GRÆCIA, INCLUDING EPIRUS AND THESSALIA, WITH PART OF

MACEDONIA. 16. PART OF ATTICA, WITH BEOTIA, PHOCIS, LOCRIS, MEGARIS, &c., on BLANCHARD AND LEA'S PUBLICATIONS.

an enlarged scale. 17. PLAN OF ATHENS - ATHENS AND ITS HARBORS. 18. PELOPONNESUS, WITH ATTICA AND BEOTIA. 19. THE COASTS AND ISLANDS OF THE ÆGÆAN SEA. 20. ASIA MINOR AND THE NORTHERN PART OF SYRIA. 21. PALÆSTINA, WITH PART OF SYRIA-PLAN OF JERUSALEM. 22. ASSYRIA AND THE ADJACENT COUNTRIES. 23, MAURITANIA, NUMIDIA, and AFRICA.- THE AFRICAN COAST FROM

THE SYRTIS MINOR TO EGYPT.-ENLARGED PLAN OF THE CARTHAGINIAN TERRITORY.

LONG'S CLASSICAL ATLAS-LIST OF PLATES, CONTINUED. 24. ARABIA PETRÆA AND PART OF EGYPT, INCLUDING THE DELTA. 25. GERMANIA MAGNA, WITII TIE PROVINCES OF THE UPPER DANUBE. 26. TROJA.- TIERMOPYLE.--MARATIION. - PLATÆA. - MANTINEA.

LEUCTRA.-ROUTE OF XENOPTION.-GRANICUS-ISSUS.- ARBELA. THRACIAN BOSPORUS.--ALEXANDRIA. It will be observed that in addition to a very thorough series of maps of all the countries known to the ancients, the Atlas contains a large number of topographical plans, on an enlargod scale, of important places, elucidating in many ways, passages in the classical writers. In this manner it is believed that much assistance will be rendered to the student who desires to obtain a clear comprehension of ancient history.

The name of Mr. Long as a sound and accurate classical scholar is too widely known to render necessary any assurances of the correctness of a work which Las enjoyed his editorial care. In reproducing it in this country, various additions have been thought desirable. A complete, though compendious, sketch of Ancient Geography has been prefixed, rendering the volume complete in itself as a text book or work of reference. Two plates bave been added, one comprising the views entertained by the ancient geographers, and showing the gradual de. velopment of knowledge from the earliest times; the other consisting of topographical plans, on nn enlarged scale, of various places of note. From a desire to present nothing that was merely conjectural, Mr. Long inserted no boundaries on the maps. While admitting the impossibility of at present determining with absolute accuracy the limits of contiguous territories, it yet was thought that without some indication of their position, as generally received by classical scholars, the student would feel the want of an assistance to which he bad become accustomed, and they have accordingly been introduced from standard authorities.

Every care has been taken throughout to obtain entire accuracy in the most careful revision of both maps and text by the competent scholar who has made the additions and superintended the press. Should errors, however, have escaped attention, the publishers would respectfully solicit a communication of them for immediate correction.

In thus presenting, at so very moderate a price, an Atlas more complete in its scope than any which have yet been offered to the American student, the publishers trust that their efforts have not been misdirected, and that they will be found to have succeeded in producing a work in every way suited to the increasing requirements of the advanced classical scholarship of the age.

In the preface to his edition of Cesar, Mr. Long has exhibited so complete a mastery of the geography of his subject, th- in reading his author we always wished for his own map of the scene of operations; w... our wish has now been gratified by the present publication, which, amongst others, contains of course a map of ancient Gaul. We will not pretend that we have diligently examined every map; but we have examined quite enough to be fully justified in declaring these maps what we are conscientiously persuaded of their being, the very best of the sort that have been published in England; they are also beautifully executed, and published at a moderate price for so elaborate a work. We very earnestly recommend ihis list of maps to every student who desires to study ancient literature with full advantage.-Standard.

Now that we are so well supplied with classical dictionaries, it is highly desirable that we should also have an atlas worthy to accompany them. " Butler's Atlas" has long been very useful, but the time has now come for some improvement upon it; and in the volume before us is to be found all that can be desired. The names of those who have been concerned in its preparation speak for themselves. On examination, we find it adapted to the present state

of classical scholarship, and distinguished by a saperior style of execution. The wants of the classical student have been carefully consulted throughout; all places of peculiar interest, such as Rome, Athens, and its harbors; Syrucuse, &c., being given upou an enlarged scale, and the relative positions of the public buildings, roads, &c., clearly exhibited. We notice, also, that places which have more ilan one name in the classics, such as Dyrrachium and Epidamnus, Carchedon and Car

age, appear with both the Atlas. As a companion to Dr. Smith's new “ Dictionary of Geography,” this Atlas will be valuable.--Athenown.

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