The greater poems of Virgil: The first six books of the Aeneid

Front Cover
Ginn, 1895 - Latin language - 307 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 333 - 9-12 : In such a night Stood Dido, with a willow in her hand, Upon the wild sea-banks and waft her love To come again to Carthage. 554. certus eundi, determined to go (§ 298 ; G. 428 ; H. 542, i). 556. eodem, ie as in v. 265. 558. omnia, Greek ace. 559. iuventa, abl. of manner. 560. hoc
Page 239 - 726-730 : From the arched roof, Pendent by subtle magic, many a row Of starry lamps and blazing cressets, fed With naphtha and asphaltus, yielded light As from a sky. Pope, Temple of Fame, vv. 143, 144 : As heav'n with stars, the roof with jewels glows, And ever-living lamps depend in rows.
Page 195 - are conceived as spinning the threads of human fate : Clotho holds a spindle ; Lachësis draws the thread, and Átropos cuts it off : — Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life. — Lycidas. Those three fatall Sisters, whose sad hands Doo weave the direfull threds of destinie, And in their wrath brake off the
Page 388 - Even from out thy slime The monsters of the deep are made. 730. igneus vigor: the " fiery force " and " heavenly source " found in these forms of life (seminibus) are two expressions for the same thing; the celestial ether being conceived as flame. 731. quantum, etc., ie so far as the gross nature of the body allows. Cf. Shakspere, Merchant of Venice,
Page 338 - from an ancient vase-painting.) Cf. Shakspere, Tempest, iv. I. 76-82: Hail, many-color'd messenger, that ne'er Dost disobey the wife of Jupiter; Who with thy saffron wings upon my flowers Diffuses! honey-drops, refreshing showers, And with each end of thy blue bow dost crown My bosky acres and my unshrubb'd down, Rich scarf to my proud earth.
Page 209 - Now had th' Almighty Father from above From the pure empyrean where he sits High thron'd above all highth, bent down his eye, His own works and their works at once to view. 224. despiciens, looking down upon. For an ancient wall painting of Jupiter in a similar attitude see Fig. 5. — velivolum, winged with Fig-
Page 45 - Tempus erat, quo prima quies mortalibus aegris incipit, et dono divom gratissima serpit. In somnis, ecce, ante oculos maestissimus Hector 270 visus adesse mihi, largosque effundere fletus, raptatus bigis, ut quondam, aterque cruento pulvere, perqué pedes traiectus lora tumentis. Ei mihi, qualis erat, quantum mutatus ab illo Hectore, qui redit exuvias indutus Achilli,
Page 79 - 390 triginta capitum fetus enixa iacebit, alba, solo recubans, albi circum ubera nati, is locus urbis erit, requies ea certa laborum. Nee tu mensarum morsus horresce futuros : fata viam invenient, aderitque vocatus Apollo. 395 'Avoid the Eastern Shore.' 'Has autem terras, Italique hanc litoris oram, proxuma quae nostri perfunditur aequoris aestu, effuge ; cuneta
Page 150 - lamque fere mediam caeli nox húmida metam 835 contigerat ; placida laxabant membra quiete sub remis fusi per dura sedilia nautae : cum levis aetheriis delapsus Somnus ab astris aëra dimovit tenebrosum et dispulit umbras, te, Palinure, petens, tibi somnia tristia portans 840 insonti ; puppique deus consedit in alta, Phorbanti similis, funditque has ore loquelas :
Page 201 - and Argestes loud. And Thracias, rend the woods, and seas upturn ; With adverse blast upturns them from the south Notus, and Afer black with thunderous clouds From Serralonia : thwart of these, as fierce, Forth rush the Levant and the Ponent winds, Eurus and Zephyr, with their lateral noise, Sirocco and Libecchio.

Bibliographic information