The History of Political Literature, from the Earliest Times, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1855 - Greece - 455 pages
 

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Page 133 - But we do hope to find out all your tricks, Your plots and packing, worse than those of Trent, That so the Parliament May, with their wholesome and preventive shears, Clip your phylacteries, though baulk your ears, And succour our just fears When they shall read this clearly in your charge, New Presbyter is but Old Priest writ large.
Page 163 - This power to act according to discretion for the public good, without the prescription of the law and sometimes even against it...
Page 422 - Renowned for their deeds as far from home, For Christian service and true chivalry, As is the sepulchre in stubborn Jewry Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's Son, This land of such dear souls, this dear dear land, Dear for her reputation through the world...
Page 172 - These are the heroes that despise the Dutch And rail at new-come foreigners so much ; Forgetting that themselves are all derived From the most scoundrel race that ever lived...
Page 158 - May I speak a few words in my own defence? Judge. Sirrah, Sirrah, thou deservest to live no longer, but to be slain immediately upon the place; yet that all men may see our gentleness towards thee, let us hear what thou, vile runagate, hast to say.
Page 108 - Person should be compelled to make any Loans to the King against his Will, because such Loans were against Reason and the Franchise of the Land ; and by other Laws of this Realm it is provided, That none should be charged by any Charge or Imposition called a Benevolence...
Page 125 - Areopagitica, a Speech of Mr. John Milton for the liberty of unlicensed Printing.
Page 135 - ... where they undoubtedly, that by their labours, counsels, and prayers, have been earnest for the common good of religion and their country, shall receive above the inferior orders of the blessed, the regal addition of principalities, legions, and thrones into their glorious titles ; and in supereminence of beatific vision, progressing the dateless and irrevohible circle of eternity, shall clasp inseparable hands with joy and bliss, in over-measure for ever.
Page 102 - England, and the making and maintenance of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances, which daily happen within this Realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in Parliament ; and that in the handling and proceeding of those businesses every member of the House hath, and of right ought to have, Freedom of Speech, to propound, treat, reason and bring to conclusion the same...
Page 59 - ... period, who united elegant learning to original and masculine thought, was Buchanan ; and he, too, seems, to have been the first scholar who caught from the ancients the noble flame of republican enthusiasm. This praise is merited by his neglected, though incomparable, tract, ' De Jure Regni,' in which the principles of popular politics, and the maxims of a free government, are delivered with a precision, and enforced with an energy, which no former age had equalled, and no succeeding has surpassed.

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