A Treatise on the Nature, Properties and Composition of Ancient and Modern Wines: Including the Wines of the Scriptures with Answers to Popular Objections to the Wine Question Tee-totally Considered

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J. Pasco. Manchester: W. P. Ellerby, printer, 1839 - 76 pages
 

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Page 20 - And in this mountain shall the Lord of hosts make unto all people a feast of fat things, a feast of wines on the lees, of fat things full of marrow , of wines on the lees well refined.
Page 43 - And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is My body. And He took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it; for this is My blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.
Page 30 - These subterraneous philosophers are daily employed in the transmutation of liquors, and, by the power of magical drugs and incantations, raising under the streets of London the choicest products of the hills and valleys of France. They can squeeze Bordeaux out of the sloe, and draw Champagne from an apple. Virgil, in that remarkable prophecy, Incultisque rubens pendebit sentibus uva. V1sa. ECL. iv. 39. The ripening grape shall hang on every thorn...
Page 10 - O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil ! lago.
Page 30 - There is, in this city, a certain fraternity of chemical operators, who work under ground in holes, caverns, and dark retirements, to conceal their mysteries from the eyes and observation of mankind. These subterraneous philosophers are daily employed in the transmutation of liquors, and, by the power of magical drugs and incantations, raising under the streets of London the choicest products of the hills and valleys of France.
Page 38 - ... informed in medical science that the above opinion is altogether erroneous. Man, in ordinary health, like other animals, requires not any such stimulants, and cannot be benefited by the habitual employment of any quantity of them, large or small ; nor will their use during his life-time increase the aggregate amount of his labor. In whatever quantity they are employed they will rather tend to diminish it.
Page 54 - Woe unto them that are mighty to drink wine, and men of strength to mingle strong drink: Which justify the wicked for reward, and take away the righteousness of the righteous from him!
Page 19 - For their vine is of the vine of Sodom, And of the fields of Gomorrah : Their grapes are grapes of gall, Their clusters are bitter: Their wine is the poison of dragons, And the cruel venom of asps.
Page 7 - It may perhaps be worth remarking, that throughout the wide-spread kingdoms of animal and vegetable nature, not a particle of alcohol in any form or combination whatever has been found as the effect of a single living process, but that it • Tbe hair having been previously sheared off. arises only out of the decay, the dissolution, and the wreck of organized matter...
Page 38 - An opinion handed down from rude and ignorant times, and imbibed by Englishmen from their youth, has become very general, that the habitual use of some portion of alcoholic drink, as of wine, beer or spirits, is beneficial to health, and even necessary to those who are subjected to habitual labor.

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