The Monthly Repository, and Library of Entertaining Knowledge, Volume 2

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Francis S. Wiggins, 1832
 

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Page 71 - He telleth the number of the stars; he calleth them all by their names. Great is our Lord, and of great power: his understanding is infinite.
Page 71 - Memory and her siren daughters ; but by devout prayer to that Eternal Spirit who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge, and sends out his seraphim with the hallowed fire of his altar to touch and purify the lips of whom He pleases.
Page 256 - If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.
Page 282 - Temple of it ;" — that city from above, which hath " no need of the sun, neither of the moon to shine in it ; for the glory of God doth lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.
Page 46 - Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of gods? where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my last At even, which I bred up with tender hand From the first opening bud, and gave ye names, Who now shall rear thee to the sun, or rank Your tribes, and water from the ambrosial fount?
Page 193 - ... to read good authors, or cause them to be read, till the attention be weary, or memory have its full fraught: then with useful and generous labours preserving...
Page 387 - Caesar had his Brutus — Charles the first, his Cromwell — and George the third — (" Treason," cried the Speaker — " treason, treason ", echoed from every part of the House.
Page 21 - All the fountains of the great deep were broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened.
Page 302 - There are many more shining qualities in the mind of man, but there is none so useful as discretion ; it is this indeed which gives a value to all the rest, which sets them at work in their proper times and places, and turns them to the advantage of the person who is possessed of them. Without it, learning is pedantry, and wit impertinence ; virtue itself looks like weakness ; the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice.
Page 64 - Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ...

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