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the people, Ireland has seen her peaceful : natives employed in the useful labours . of life; her citizens, confident in each, other, improving trade and commerce, » under a variety of difficulties; her judges respected on their tribunals; and the pleasing scenes of harmony and union spread through every province. Such the result of benevolence! Such the fruits of toleration! Such was our situation, when in Great-Britain nothing could be feest but the course of public justice pended, and martial law proclaimed, the law and the legislature trampled in threjt awful fanctuary; the torn, canonicals of bishops, the lacerated robes of temporary peers, the streets ensanguined with the streaming blood of deluded vi&ims fumptuous edifices changed into blazing piles; the conflagration of Rome renewed by the torch of religious frenzy, the houses of inoffensive citizens chalked out for destruction; a city given up to plunder; assassins and malefactors let Toose from their chains, and invited, by the hollow voice of fanaticism, to fare the spoils; a king on the verge of de

struction

struction; a kingdom on the eve of being plunged into the calamities of civil war, the sword taking the place of the robe, and dictating to the violators of the law; and the stern hand of justice succeeding, in its turn, to the sword, and sweeping from the face of the earth, the gleanings of military execution. Such the poisonous fruits of misguided zeal, and religious intolerance! The feeds of such disasters have been sown in distant times, when barbarity, or the compofitionele con of princes, contending for the throne, contributed to divide the people; and, from a mistaken policy, sovereigns themselves, in opposition to the maxims of legislation and wisdom, thought it more eligible to become heads of the half, than the fathers of all their subjects. ; Such measures weakened their arms abroad, and will ever prove destructive at home. In every plain the English generals met with their fellow subjects, disputing the laurel, under the banners of kings who gave them encouragement,

The Catholic and Protestant powers on the Continent, by adopting a differ

ent

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TRA C T S:

:: THE REV. ARTHUR O'LEARY.

CONTAINING,

1. A Defence of the Divinity of Chrif hended invasion by the French and

and the Immortality of the Soul : in Spaniards, in July, 1779, when the
answer to the author of a work, united fleeis of Bourbon appeared
lately published in Cork, entitled,] in the Channel.
66 Thoughts on Nature and Religi-1 IV. Remarks on, a letter written by
“ on.” Revised and corrected. I

Mr. Wesley, and a Defence of the
II. Loyalty offerted or, a Vindicati. Protettant Associations.

on of the Oath of Allegiance ; with
an impartialenquiry into the Pope's/V. Rejoinder to Mr. Wesley's Reply
TEMPORAL power, and the pre-l to the above Remarks.
fent claims of the STUARTS TO VI. Essay on Toleration : tending to
the English throne : proving that prove that a man's 'SPECUIA-

both are equally groundless. I TIVE opinions ooght not to deprive
III. An Address to the common People him of the rights of civil society.

of Ireland, on occasion of an appre-l...

. In which are introduced,
The Rev. John Wesley's Letter, and the Defence of the

Protestant Associations. .

THE SECOND EDITION.

DU BLIN:
PRINTED BY JOHN CHA M B E R SI ; ;'

M.DCC.LXXXI.

VM

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