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Victory. In vain do we give ourselves up to Irarred and vengeance. We soon discover that fiich cruel pleasure was never adapted to the fceart of man: that in hating others we punish tmjfsetves; that humanity disclaims violence; and that the law of God, in commanding Us to love our neighbour,, has consulted the most upright and reasonable dictates of the human heart. The world is tired of religious disputes, and it is high time for you, (kntlemen, to be tired of me.

It is time to agree to a truce, and leave the Seld to such champions as are willing to engage rrrnational, and politics;! contests, infinitely mere useful to the public, than- the threacfFpm arguments of polemical divinity, decrees' of councils, or obsolete canons.

Should any of the champions of the eightyfive legions of Glaseow, or any of their allies and confederates found the trumpet, I (hall not prepare myself, for battle. If I attempted to throw fanaticism into ridicule, they are welcome to discharge at me arrows reposited in the quivers of the Spaaifo Triar, and the Duenna. Of what use is it to the public, if I have recourse to Chrysal, or, the Adventures of a Guinea, where our modern apostles are taken off in the conserence between Momus and Mother Brimstone.

If,

If the attack be serious, the weapons will be taken from- the mouldering arsenals of old councils, popes decrees, and obsolete canons. There it will be a repetition of the fame thing, forever and for aye, to use the words of old Robin Hood. But ihould Mr. Wesley, or W, A D—mm—d, or any apostle belonging to the eighty five societies, intend to be of use to the public, I shall co-operate with their pious endeavours, with all the veins in my heart.

. We have obtained of late the privilege of planting tobacco in Ireland, and Out tobacconists want paper. Let Mr. Westey then come with me, as the curette and barber went tojhave • and bless the library of Don Quixote. AH the old books, old canons, sermons, and so forth, tending to kindle feuds, or promote rancour, let us fling them out at the windows. Society will lose nothing. The tobacconist will benefit by the spoils of antiquity. And if, upon mature deliberation, we decree that Mr. Wesley's Journal, and his apology for the Association's Appeal, should share the same fate wUh the old buckrams, we will procure them a gen'tie fall After having rocked ourselves, in the large and hospitable cradle of the Free-press, where the peer and , the commoner the priest and the alderman, the friar and swaddler, can flfetch themselves at full length, provided

they they be hot too churlish, let us laugh at those who breed useless quarrels, and set to the world the bright example of toleration and benevolence.

A peaceable life and happy death to all Adam's children! May the ministers of religion of every denomination, whether they pray at the head of their congregations in embroidered vestments^ or black gowns, short coats, grey locks, powdered wigs, or black curls, instead of enflaming the rabble, and inspiring their hearers with hatred and animosity for their fellow creatures^ recommend love, peace, and harmony 1

In my universal prayer, gentlemen, let me not forget the compositor, who, in Tuesday's paper, made me fix a false doctrine upon Calvin. Instead of Calvin taught that' usury is lawful, he makes me fay, Calvin taught that venery is lawful; and, instead of saying, Hence from the opinions of men, or the actions of popes, 13c. in one age, there is no arguing lo the belief of men in another; instead of arguing, he makes me say

agreeing.

*

Thus, by the transposition of types, and change of words, a compositor has more magic than Circe, who metamorphosed Ulysses' crew into wild beasts. For compositors can

change change an old Usurer into a young Venus,— usury into venery, and a wrangling argument into a cordial agreement! God grant him more exactness in printing this; and grant your. selves and the whole world, peace, health, and prosperity, and grant the curious searchers of old books, more humanity, and less controversy.

I have the honour to be,

i

Gentlemen,

your most affectionate,
and humble servant,

ARTHUR O'LEARY.

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