The Life of John Locke, Volume 1

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Harper & brothers, 1876 - Philosophers - 506 pages
 

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Page 137 - Of these the false Achitophel was first, A name to all succeeding ages curst: For close designs and crooked counsels fit, Sagacious, bold, and turbulent of wit...
Page 137 - A martial hero first, with early care, Blown, like a pigmy by the winds, to war. A beardless chief, a rebel, ere a man, So young his hatred to his Prince began.
Page 361 - I do not deny but history is very useful, and very instructive of human life ; but if it be studied only for the reputation of being an historian, it is a very empty thing ; and he that can tell all the particulars of Herodotus and Plutarch, Curtius and Livy, without making any other use of them, may be an ignorant man with a good memory, and with all his pains hath only filled his head with Christmas tales.
Page 169 - This presumptuous imposing of the senses of men upon the words of God, the special senses of men upon the general words of God, and laying them upon men's consciences together, under the equal penalty of death and damnation, this vain conceit that we can speak of the things of God better than in the words of God...
Page 271 - A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts and nothing long ; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 248 - Were it fit to trouble thee with the history of this Essay, I should tell thee, that five or six friends meeting at my chamber, and discoursing on a subject very remote from this, found themselves quickly at a stand, by the difficulties that rose on every side.
Page 22 - Can there be any thing more ridiculous, than that a father should waste his own money, and his son's time, in setting him to learn the Roman language, when, at the same time, he designs him for a trade...
Page 137 - Bartering his venal wit for sums of gold, He cast himself into the saint-like mould ; Groan'd, sigh'd, and pray'd, while godliness was gain, The loudest bagpipe of the squeaking train.
Page 137 - A daring pilot in extremity; Pleased with the danger, when the waves went high He sought the storms; but, for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands to boast his wit.
Page 242 - Since charity obliges us to wish well to the souls of all men, and religion ought to alter nothing in any man's civil estate or right, it shall be lawful for slaves as well as others to enter themselves and to be of what church or profession any of them shall think best, and thereof be as fully members as any freeman.

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