Proverbial philosophy: a book of thoughts and arguments

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Rickerby, 1839 - 311 pages

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Page 300 - And immediately I was in the spirit; and behold, a throne was set in heaven, and one sat on the throne ; and he that sat was to look upon like a jasper and a sardine stone ; and there was a rainbow round about the throne, in sight like unto an emerald.
Page 256 - The harp and the voi(Je may thrill thee, — sound may enchant thine ear, But consider thou, the hand will wither, and the sweet notes turn to discord : The eye, so brilliant at even, may be red with sorrow in the morning ; And the sylph-like form of elegance must writhe in the crampings of pain.
Page 188 - Need to humour no caprice, need to bear with no infirmity; Thy sin, thy slander, or neglect, chilleth not, quencheth not, its love: Unalterably speaketh it the truth, warped nor by error nor interest; For a good book is the best of friends, the same to-day and for ever.
Page 255 - Thou knowest not his good-will : — be thy prayer then submissive thereunto ; And leave thy petition to his mercy, assured that he will deal well with thee. If thou art to have a wife of thy youth, she is now living on the earth ; Therefore think of her, and pray for her weal ; yea, though thou hast not seen her.
Page 11 - Corn from the sheaves of science, with stubble from mine own garner ; Searchings after Truth, that have tracked her secret lodes, And come up again to the surface-world, with a knowledge grounded deeper ; Arguments of high...
Page 251 - Quiet, yet flowing deep, as the Rhine among rivers ; Lasting, and knowing not change — it walketh with Truth and Sincerity. Love : — what a volume in a word, an ocean in a tear...
Page 144 - For there is nothing in the earth so small that it may not produce great things, And no swerving from a right line, that may not lead eternally astray.
Page 118 - Nevertheless, wretched man, if thy bad heart be hardened in the flame, iking earth-born, as of clay, and not of moulded wax, Judge not the hand that smiteth, as if thou wert visited in wrath : Reproach thyself, for He is Justice ; repent thee, for He is Mercy. Cease, fond caviller at wisdom, to be satisfied that...
Page 264 - Scratch the green rind of a sapling, or wantonly twist it in the soil, The scarred and crooked oak will tell of thee for centuries to come...
Page 297 - Latini, et quo quemque modo fugiatque feratque laborem. sunt geminae Somni portae, quarum altera fertur cornea, qua veris facilis datur exitus umbris, altera candenti perfecta nitens elephanto, sed falsa ad caelum mittunt insomnia Manes.

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