Page images
PDF
EPUB

BACON'S ESSAYS.

HUNTER'S ANNOTATED

SHAKESPEARE.

The following Plays may now be had,

Price One SHILLING each :KING JOHN.

TWO GENTLEMEN of RICHARD II.

VERONA. RICHARD III.

AS YOU LIKE IT. HENRY IV. PART I.

TWELFTA NIGHT. HENRY IV. PART II.

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS HENRY V.

WELL. HENRY VI. PART I.

The COMEDY of ERRORS. HENRY VI. PART II.

MEASURE for MEASURE. HENRY VI. PART III.

MUCH ADO ABOUT HENRY VIII.

NOTHING, JULIUS CÆSAR.

TAMING of the SHREW. CORIOLANUS.

MERRY WIVES of ANTONY and CLEOPATRA,

WINDSOR. TROILUS and CRESSIDA.

MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S ROMEO and JULIET.

DREAM. HAMLET.

CYMBELINE. MACBETH.

The TEMPEST. KING LEAR.

OTHELLO. LOVES LABOURS LOST.

WINTER'S TALE. MERCHANT of VENICE.

TIMON of ATHENS.

[blocks in formation]

UNIVERSITY MIDDLE-CLASS EXAMINATION PAPER ON THE ESSAYS,

BY THE REV. JOHN HUNTER, M.A.

One of the National Society's Examiners of Middle-Class Schools
Formerly Vice-Principal of the Society's Training College, Battersea.

LONDON :
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

1873.

All rights reserved.

[blocks in formation]

PREFACE.

*THE word Essay,' says Archbishop Whately, 'has been considerably changed in its application since the days of Bacon. By an Essay was originally meant-according to the obvious and natural sense of the word—a slight sketch, to be filled up by the reader ; brief hints, designed to be followed out; loose thoughts on some subject, thrown out without much regularity, but sufficient to suggest further inquiries and reflections. Any more elaborate, regular, and finished composition, such as in our days often bears the title of an Essay, our ancestors called a treatise, tractate, dissertation, or discourse.'

It was, indeed, evidently a main purpose of Bacon's Essays 'to suggest further inquiries and reflections.' In a Dedication to the Prince of Wales, which he intended to prefix to the edition of 1612, but withdrew on account of the Prince's death, he calls them * certain brief notes, set down rather significantly than curiously:'dispersed meditations :' 'grains of salt, that will rather give you an appetite, than offend you

« PreviousContinue »