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Books Books 1 - 10 of 21 on The display of humanity by a rebel,' writes the most temperate and most truthful....
" The display of humanity by a rebel,' writes the most temperate and most truthful of the loyal historians, ' was in general, in the trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a circumstance in favour of the accused. Strange as it may seem in times... "
Sequel to Personal narrative of the 'Irish rebellion' of 1798 - Page 189
by Charles Hamilton Teeling - 1832
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History of the Rebellion in Ireland: In the Year 1789 &c., Containing an ...

James Gordon - Ireland - 1801 - 302 pages
...regarded as a circutrrftance in favour pf the accufed : ftrauge as it may feem in times of cool reflexion, it was very frequently urged as a proof of guilt. Whoever could be proved to have faved a loy.a.iift from affaffination, his houfe from burning, or his pro-perty from plunder — was...
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History of the Rebellion in Ireland, in the Year 1798, &c: Containing an ...

James Bentley Gordon - Ireland - 1803 - 453 pages
...rebel, was in general, in the trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a circumstance in favour of the accused: strange as it may seem in times of...rebel commander.* This has been by some supposed. to * A mention of the notoriety of this practice drew unreflectingly the following extraordinary exclamation...
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History of the rebellion in Ireland in ... 1798. With an appendix

James Bentley Gordon - 1803
...rebel, was in general, in the trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a circumstance in favour of the accused : strange as it may seem in times of...his house from burning, or his property from plunder — Mras considered as having influence among the rebels, consequently a rebel commander.* This has...
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History of the Rebellion in Ireland, in the Year 1798, &c: Containing an ...

James Gordon - Ireland - 1803 - 453 pages
...rebel, was in general, in the trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a circumstance in favour of the accused : strange as it may seem in times of...saved a loyalist from assassination, his house from burping, or his property from plunder — was considered as having influence among the rebels, consequently...
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History of the Civil War in Ireland, Containing an Impartial ..., Volume 2

James Gordon - Ireland - 1805
...death of many, and the display of humanity in them in protecting their enemies, was in general, in the trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a...proof of guilt. Whoever could be proved to have saved an Orangeman or a Rayalist from assassination, his house from burning, or his property from plunder—was....
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A history of Ireland ... to ... 1801

James Bentley Gordon - 1806
...means of conviction were negIe6led. Strange as it may seem, a6ls of humanity were considered as proofs of guilt. Whoever could be proved to have saved a...house from burning, or his property from plunder, was pronounced to have had influence among the rebels, consequently a rebel commander. Thus men of a6live...
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An Account of Ireland, Statistical and Political, Volume 2

Wakefield, Edward - Ireland - 1812
...rebel, was in general in trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a circumstance in favour of the accused : strange as it may seem in times of...having influence among the rebels ; consequently, was thought a rebel commander."* I had often heard the remark before I saw this work, and many instances...
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The Monthly Review, from January to April Inclusive. 1839. Vol. I

The Monthly Review from january to April inclusive 1839 VOL.I - 1839
...the successful display of humanity by a person accused was verv frequently urged, and with success, as a proof of guilt. Whoever could be proved to have saved a Royalist from assassination, his house from being burned, or his property from plunder, was considered...
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The life of Thomas Reynolds

Thomas Reynolds - 1839
...the successful display of humanity by a persou accused was very frequently urged, and with success, as a proof of guilt. Whoever could be proved to have saved a Royalist from assassination, his house from being burned, or his property from plunder, was considered...
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History of the Irish Rebellion of 1798

Philip Harwood - Ireland - 1844 - 248 pages
...rebel was, in general, in trials by court-martial, by no means regarded as a circumstance in favour of the accused. Strange as it may seem in times of...among the rebels ; consequently, a rebel commander." It is said of a gentleman implicated in the rebellion, that he exclaimed, in anticipation of his trial,...
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