The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1650-1740

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 18, 1998 - Literary Criticism - 334 pages
This volume offers an account of English literary culture in one of its most volatile and politically engaged moments. From the work of Milton and Marvell in the 1650s and 1660s through the brilliant careers of Dryden, Rochester, and Behn, Locke and Astell, Swift and Defoe, Pope and Montagu, the pressures and extremes of social, political, and sexual experience are everywhere reflected in literary texts: in the daring lyrics and intricate political allegories of this age, in the vitriol and bristling topicality of its satires as well as in the imaginative flight of its mock epics, fictions, and heroic verse. The volume's chronologies and select bibliographies will guide the reader through texts and events, while the fourteen essays commissioned for this Companion will allow us to read the period anew.
 

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Contents

VII
3
VIII
33
IX
58
X
82
XI
104
XII
120
XIII
143
XIV
163
XVI
185
XVIII
204
XX
225
XXI
250
XXII
276
XXIV
307
XXVI
330
Copyright

XV
165

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About the author (1998)

James Anderson Winn was born in Charlotte, North Carolina on July 31, 1947. He started playing flute in the sixth grade and was able to study with Francis Fuge, the principal flutist of the Louisville Symphony, in the 1960s. Winn received a bachelor's degree in English from Princeton University in 1968. He then spent two years in the Army, playing flute in the Continental Army Band. He received a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1974. He taught at Yale from 1974 to 1983, the University of Michigan from 1983 to 1998, and Boston University from 1998 until 2017. His first book, A Window in the Bosom, was published in 1977. His other books included John Dryden and His World, The Pale of Words, The Poetry of War, and Queen Anne: Patroness of Arts. He also played the flute with orchestras or small ensembles. He died from pancreatic cancer on March 21, 2019 at the age of 71.

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