The National Miscellany, Volume 1

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National Miscellany, 1853 - Literature
 

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Page 237 - like a distressed prince who calls in a powerful neighbour to his aid. I was undone by my auxiliary. When I had once called him in, I could not subsist without dependence on him.
Page 19 - Sennacherib, king of Assyria, came up against all the fenced cities of Judah and took them.
Page 405 - However, many of the most learned and wise adhere to the new scheme of expressing themselves by things ; which hath only this inconvenience attending it, that if a man's business be very great, and of various kinds, he must be obliged in proportion to carry a greater bundle of things upon his back, unless he can afford one or two strong servants to attend him.
Page 405 - An expedient was therefore offered, that since words are only names for things, it would be more convenient for all men to carry about them such things as were necessary to express the particular business they are to discourse on.
Page 229 - ... professes to awaken and direct your love, your pity, your kindness ; your scorn for untruth, pretension, imposture ; your tenderness for the weak, the poor, the oppressed, the unhappy. To the best of his means and ability he comments on all the ordinary actions and passions of life almost. He takes upon himself to be the week-day preacher, so to speak. Accordingly, as he finds, and speaks, and feels the truth best, we regard him, esteem him — sometimes love him.
Page 6 - SONG. ON MAY MORNING. |0 W the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flow'ry May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail, bounteous May, that dost inspire Mirth, and youth, and warm desire ; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and...
Page 82 - mong men, not mailed in scorn, But in the armour of a pure intent. Great duties are before me, and great songs, And whether crowned or crownless, when I fall, It matters not, so as God's work is done.
Page 79 - THE lark is singing in the blinding sky, Hedges are white with May. The bridegroom sea Is toying with the shore, his wedded bride, And, in the fulness of his marriage joy, He decorates her tawny brow with shells, Retires a space, to see how fair she looks, Then proud runs up to kiss her.
Page 240 - As a picture of manners the novel of "Tom Jones" is indeed exquisite: as a work of construction quite a wonder: the by-play of wisdom; the power of observation; the multiplied felicitous turns and thoughts; the varied character of the great Comic Epic; keep the reader in a perpetual admiration and curiosity.* But against Mr.
Page 227 - Lectures were once useful ; but now, when all can read, and books are so numerous, lectures are unnecessary. If your attention fails, and you miss a part of the lecture, it is lost ; you cannot go back as you do upon a book.

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