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" Shakespeare, no mere child of nature; no automaton of genius; no passive vehicle of inspiration, possessed by the spirit, not possessing it; first studied patiently, meditated deeply, understood minutely, till knowledge, become habitual and intuitive,... "
American Anthropologist - Page 119
1893
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Biographia Literaria: Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary Life and Opinions

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Aesthetics - 1817 - 309 pages
...domination, over the whole world of language. What then shall we say ? even this ; that Shakspeare, no mere child of nature ; no automaton of genius ;...to that power, which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as his compeer not rival. While the former...
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The republic of letters, [ed.] by A. Whitelaw

Alexander Whitelaw - 1833
...possessing it,—first studied patiently, meditated deeply, understood minutely, till knowledge became habitual and intuitive, wedded itself to his habitual...class— to that power which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as his compeer, not rival. While the former...
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Biographia Literaria: Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary Life and Opinions

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Criticism - 1834 - 351 pages
...What then shall we say ? even this : that Shakspeare, no mere child of nature; no automaton of geniqs; no passive vehicle of inspiration possessed by the...or second in his own class ; to that power, which scaled him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as his compeer,...
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Biographia Literaria: Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary ..., Volumes 1-2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Criticism - 1834 - 351 pages
...at length gave birth to that stupendous power, by which he stands alone, with no equal or sec. ond in his own class ; to that power, which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as his compeer, not rival. While the former...
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The Republic of Letters: A Selection, in Poetry and Prose, from ..., Volume 3

Alexander Whitelaw - Literature - 1835
...knowledge became habitual and intuitive, wedded itself to his habitual feelings, and at length gave birlh to that stupendous power, by which he stands alone,...class—- to that power which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as his compeer, not rival. While the former...
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Biographia Literaria; Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary Life and Opinions

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1847 - 804 pages
...11 [Venus and Adonis. Ed.] of language. What then shall we say ? even this ; that Shak„. speare, no mere child of nature ; no automaton of genius ;...to that power, which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as his compeer, not rival. While the former...
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Biographia Literaria; Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary ..., Volume 2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1847 - 804 pages
...feelings, and at length gave birth to that stu-3 endous power, by which he stands alone, with no equal on; second in his own class ; to that power, which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, v/ith Milton as his compeer, not rival. While the former...
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Biographia Literaria; Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary Life and Opinions

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1847 - 804 pages
...feelings, and at length gave birth to that s'." i pendous power, by which he stands alone, with no equal second in his own class ; to that power, which seated him on oi! of the two glory -smitten summits of the poetic, mountain, wiu Milton as his compeer, not rival....
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The American Whig Review, Volume 8

1848
...world of language. YOU II. KO. I. NSW SERIES. 4 What then shall we say? even this: that Shakspeare, no mere child of nature ; no automaton of genius ;...; to that power which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton as hiť compeer, not rival. While the former...
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The American Whig Review, Volume 7

1848
...genius; no passive vehicle of inspiration possessed by the spirit, not possessing it; first itudied patiently, meditated deeply, understood minutely,...; to that power which seated him on one of the two glory-smitten summits of the poetic mountains, with Millon as his compeer, not rival. While the former...
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