The American Union Speaker: Containing Standard and Recent Selections in Prose and Poetry, for Recitation and Declamation, in Schools, Academies and Colleges : with Introductory Remarks on Elocution, and Explanatory Notes

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Thompson, Brown, 1875 - Elocution - 536 pages
 

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Contents

On the Irish Disturbance Bill D 0 Connell
44
Caesars Pause upon the Rubicon J S Knowles
45
Gustavus Vasa to the Dalecarlians Anonymous
46
Nobility of Labor O Dewey
47
4 Salathiel to Titus G Croly 49 An Appeal to the Loyalty of South Carolina A Jackson
49
The Same Concluded A Jackson
50
Cause for Indian Resentment W Wirt
52
64 Speech against a Libeller Griffin 65 New England and the Union S S Prentiss 56 On sending Relief to Ireland S S Prentiss
56
The New England Common School S S Prentiss
57
Christianity the Source of Reform E H Chapin
58
Northern Laborers C Nayhr
59
Broughams Attack on Canning described Anonymous
60
South Carolina during the Revolution R 7 Bayne
61
Incompetency of Parliament W C Plunkett
62
Washington C Phillips
63
Education C Phillips
64
Character of Napoleon Bonaparte C Phillips
65
A Collision of Vices G Canning
66
Measures not Men G Canning
67
Parliamentary Reform Lord Brougham
68
69 Denunciation of Slavery IjOrd Brougham
69
The Teachers of Mankind Lord Brougham
70
The Greatness of Washington Lord Brougham
71
Washington a Man of Genius E P Whipple
72
Irish Aliens and English Victories R L Sheil
73
The Iliad and the Bible Dr Wayland
74
On admitting California into the Union W H Seward
75
A Highway to the Pacific T H Benton
76
Address toPolish Exiles in London L Kossuth
77
Kossuth on his Credentials L Kossuth
78
Eulogy on OConnell W H Seward
79
National Bankruptcy Mirabeau
80
A Tribute to Massachusetts C Sumner
81
Robesoierres Last Speech Robespierre
82
The Mayflower and the Pilgrims E Everett
83
The Indian Chief to the White Settler E Everett
86
The Men of SeventySix E Everett 88 The Same Concluded E Everett
88
Our Common Schools E Everett
89
9C Websters greatest Parliamentary Effort E Everett 91 What Good will the Monument do? E Everett
91
Emancipation of the Cttholics of Ireland J P Ourran
92
The Public Informer J P Ourran
93
94 Red Jackets Speech to the Missionary Cram
94
Partition of Poland C J
95
National Disgrace C J
96
A Political Pause C J
97
Washingtons Sword and Franklins Staff J Q Adams
98
The Eight of Petition by Woman J Q Adams
99
Value of Popularity Lord Mansfield
134
Scorn to be Slaves J Warren
135
Loss of the Arctic H W Betcher
136
The Glory and Grandeur of Peace C Sumner
138
Ancient and Modern Productions C Sumner
139
The Abolition of the Slave Trade W Pitt
141
Let there be Light H Mann
143
True Eloquence JO Webster
144
South Carolina and Massachusetts D Webster
145
African Slave Trade D Webster
147
Supposed Speech of John Adams D Webster
149
The Same Concluded D Webster
151
Influence of the Character of Washington D Webster
154
The Murderers Secret D Webster
155
The Same Concluded D Webster
156
Defence of American Clergymen D Webster
157
Peaceable Secession impossible D Webster
158
Liberty and Union D Webster
160
Events Great because of their Results D Webster
161
The Future of America D Webster
163
Liberty of Speech D Webster
164
Washington to the Present Generation D Webster
165
The Platform of the Constitution D Webster
166
The Veterans of the Battle of Bunker Hill D Webster
168
Reply to the Reflections of Mr Walpole Lord Chatham
170
Speech against the American War Lord Chatham
171
Speech against Employing Indians in War Lord Chatham
172
Honorable Ambition H Clay
174
The Noblest Public Virtue H Clay
175
Plea for the Union H Clay
176
National Glory H Clay
178
Brutus on the Death of Csai Shakspeare
179
Hamlets Address to the Players Shakspeare
180
Falstaffs Description of his Soldiers Shakspeare
181
Soliloquy on Character Shakspeare
182
Death of Hamilton Dr Notl
183
Invective against Mr Flood H Grattan
184
Reply to Mr Corry H Grattan
187
Speech of Titus Quinctius to the Romans Anonymous
188
The Boston Massacre John Hancock
190
Enterprise of New England E Burke
191
The Right of England to Tax America E Burke
192
Description of Junius E Burke
193
True Statesmanship E Burke
194
The Queen of France and the Spirit of Chivalry E Burke
195
Peroration of Opening Speech against Hastings E Burke
196
Peroration of Closing Speech against Hastings E Burke
198
The Crisis of the Nation Cicero
199
Extract from Demosthenes Demosthenes
200
Extract from Demosthenes on the Crown Demosthenes
202
Queen Elizabeth J Mackintosh
203
The Free Press J Mackintosh
205
The Liberty of the Press Lord Erskine
206
British Tyranny in India Lord Erskine
209
Politics and Religion J M Mason
210
The Star Spangled Banner F 8 Key
211
Aspirations of Youth J Montgomery
212
The Love of Country and of Home J Montgomery
213
The Bells E A Poe
214
WarSong of the Greeks 1822 T Campbell
216
The Raven E A Poe
217
Old Ironsides O W Holme
218
Charge of the Light Brigade A Tennyson
219
Spirit of Patriotism Sir W Scott
220
Parrhaiius and the Captive JV P Willis
230
The SailorBovs Dream Dimond
231
Casabianca Mrs Bemans
232
Buttle Hymn of the Berlin Landsturm Kbrner
233
The Bended Bow Mrs Bemans
234
The Better Land Mrs Bemans
235
Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers Mrs Bemans
236
Bernardo Del Carpio Mrs Bemans
237
The Destruction of Sennacherib Lord Byron
238
Speech of Moloch Milton
239
Bernardo and King Alphonso J G Lockhart
240
Hamlets Soliloquy Shakspeare
241
The Bridge of Sighs T Bood
242
Perseverance keeps Honor bright Shakspeare
243
Macbeths Soliloquy Shakspeare
244
Romeo in the Garden Shakspeare
245
Polonius to Laertes Shakspeare
246
Wolsey on being cast off by the King Shakspeare
247
Song of the Shirt T Bood
248
Press On i P Benjamin
249
Kindness Sergeant Talourd
250
Hows my Boy? S BobeU
251
American Nationally B Choate
252
Excelsior B W Longfellow
253
The Same Concluded R Choate
254
The Launching of the Ship B W Longfellow
255
The National Ensien R C Winthrop 256 An Appeal to the People J Bright
256
The Negros Complaint W Cowper
257
Strength of the Government T Parsons
258
Loss of the Royal George W Cowper
259
Step to the Captains Office and Settle G B Cheever
260
The Seminoles Reply G W Patten
261
The Three Beats G W Patten
262
The Battle of Ivry Lord Macaulay
263
Sumners First Speech in the Senate 67 W Curtis
264
The Soldier from Bingen Mrs Norton
265
Public Rumor RB Dana
266
Give me three Grains of Corn Mother Mrs A M Edmond
267
Tells Apostrophe to Liberty J 8 Knowles
269
William Tell among the Mountains J S Knowles
270
The Barons Last Banquet A G Greene
271
The Commencement of the AntiSlavery Move ment W Phillips
272
The Water Drinker E Johnson
273
Chamouni s S T Coleridge
274
Political Morality G W Curtis
275
Ideas the Life of a People 0 W Curtis
276
How they brought the Good News R Browning
277
Manhood and Country before Wealth and Lux ury 0 W Holmes
278
The Sword Miss London
279
The Fireman Anonymous
280
Speak Gently Anonymous
281
The Passions W Collins
283
The Bible Its Deep and Lasting Power T Parker
284
The Perpetuity of the Union D S Dickinson
285
Samuel Adams G W Curtis
286
New England J G Peraval 28o 204 Song for Saint Cecilias Day J Dryden
287
Our Countrys Call W C Bryant
288
The Sailors Song B W Proctor
289
Napoleon J Pterpont
290
Warrens Address at Bunker Hill J Pierpont
291
The Great Bell Roland T Tilton
292
The Massachusetts Line R Lowell
293
Thanatopsis W C Bryant
294
A BattleSong for Freedom Gail Hamilton
295
The BattleField W C Bryant
296
The Watchers J G Whiltier
297
Hallowed Ground T Campbell
298
Fall of the Indian Heroes Joarmin Miller
299
The Exile of Erin T Campbell
300
Lord Ullins Daughter T Campbell
301
The Execution of Montrose W E Aytoun
302
Fall of Warsaw T Campbell
303
Plea of Sergeant Buzfuz in Bardel vs Pick wick C Dickens
304
Mr Puffs Account of Himself R B Sheridan
305
Hohenlinden T Campbell
306
Bullum vs Boatum G A Stevens
307
Mr Peppcrages Peroration Anonymous
310
Fourth of July Oration C F Brown
311
Mark Twain on European Guides S L Clement
312
The Duel Hood 314 Music for the Million T Hood
314
Ode to mv Boy aged Three Years T Hood
315
The Height of the Ridiculous O W Holmes 317 The September Gale 0 W Holmes
317
Love and Murder Anonymous
318
31U The Removal Anonymous 320 Nongtongpaw C Dibdm
320
The Swells Soliloquy on the War Vanity Fair
321
The Alarmed Skipper J T Fields
322
The ColdWater Man J G Saxe
323
Whittling J Pierpont
324
Hotspurs Account of a Fop Shakspeare
325
How to have what we Like Horace Smith
326
The Three Black Crows Byrom
327
Helps to Read Byrom
328
The Throes of Science F Bret Harte
329
Prince Arthur of Bretagne Shakspeare
331
Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius Shakspeare
332
Dogberrys Charge Shakspeare
333
Indigestion Anonymous
334
The Two Robbers Dr Aiken
335
The Miser Fielding
336
The Letter Anonymous
337
The Frenchmans Lesson Anonymous
338
How to Tell Bad News Anonymous
339
The Choleric Father B Sheridan
340
Rolla and Alonzo S B Sheridan
341
The English Traveller Anonymous
342
Curran J P 123 124
373
Fielding 603
475
Hall Robert 46
484
The Embryo Lawyer AHingham
517
Landon Miss
533
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Page 341 - Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquished him : then burst his mighty heart ; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statue, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
Page 218 - As home his footsteps he hath turned, From wandering on a foreign strand ? If such there breathe, go mark him well ; For him no minstrel raptures swell ; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim ; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch concentered all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.
Page 179 - Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 219 - Eske River where ford there was none: But ere he alighted at Netherby gate The bride had consented, the gallant came late: For a laggard in love, and a dastard in war Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar. So boldly he...
Page 178 - Who is here so base, that would be a bondman ? If any, speak ; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude, that would not be a Roman ? If any, speak ; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile, that will not love his country ? If any, speak ; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.
Page 348 - The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ to his holiness. Nay, then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness ; And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting : I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more.
Page 209 - O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, now conceals, now discloses?
Page 347 - tis not to me she speaks: Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres, till they return. What if her eyes were there, they in her head; The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, As daylight doth a lamp; her eye in heaven Would through the airy region stream so bright, That birds would sing, and think it were not night. See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand! O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch...
Page 292 - When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one, as before, will chase His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come And make their bed with thee. As the long train Of ages...
Page 335 - There was a sound of revelry by night. And Belgium's capital had gathered then Her beauty and her chivalry ; and bright The lamps shone o'er fair women and brave men : A thousand hearts beat happily ; and when Music arose with its voluptuous swell, Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again ; And all went merry as a marriage-bell, But hush ! hark ! a deep sound strikes like a rising knell.

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