The Human Tradition in Modern Brazil

Front Cover
Peter M. Beattie
Rowman & Littlefield, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 304 pages
The Human Tradition in Modern Brazil makes the last two centuries of Brazilian history come alive through the stories of mostly non-elite individuals. The pieces in this lively collection address how people experienced historical continuities and changes by exploring how they related to the rise of Brazilian national identity and the emergence of a national state. By including a broad array of historical actors from different regions, ethnicities, occupations, races, genders, and eras, The Human Tradition in Modern Brazil brings a human dimension to major economic, political, cultural, and social transitions. While many books on modern Brazilian history emphasize the growth of the state and the oscillations of nationalist sentiment by generalizing about groups of undifferentiated people such as slaves, industrial workers, army officers, Indians, and clerics, The Human Tradition in Modern Brazil brings a personal perspective to broad historical events and trends. Because these perspectives do not always fit with the generalizations made about the predominant attitudes, values, and beliefs of different groups, they bring a welcomed complexity to the understanding of Brazilian society and history. These original and gripping vignettes of life and society in Brazil are sure to engage readers with its colorful stories of Brazilians throughout the past.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
3
IV
21
V
41
VII
51
VIII
67
IX
87
X
105
XIII
125
XVI
163
XVII
181
XVIII
197
XX
205
XXI
229
XXII
247
XXIV
265
XXVII
285

XIV
145

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - I believe in aristocracy, though— if that is the right word, and if a democrat may use it. Not an aristocracy of power, based upon rank and influence, but an aristocracy of the sensitive, the considerate and the plucky. Its members are to be found in all nations and classes, and all through the ages, and there is a secret understanding between them when they meet. They represent the true human tradition, the one permanent victory of our queer race over cruelty and chaos.
Page xxii - Scott's Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985...

About the author (2004)

Peter M. Beattie is associate professor of history at Michigan State University.

Bibliographic information