The Works of Jonathan Swift: Containing Additional Letters, Tracts, and Poems Not Hitherto Published; with Notes and a Life of the Author, Volume 18

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Page 120 - I shall never see you now I believe, one of your principal Calls to England is at an end. Indeed he was the most amiable by far, his qualities were the gentlest, but I love you as well and as firmly.
Page 165 - I will not render them less important, or less interesting, by sparing vice and folly, or by betraying the cause of truth and virtue. I will take care they shall be such, as no man can be angry at but the persons I would have angry.
Page 120 - Good God ! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? in -every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part. God keep those we have left ! few are worth praying for, and one's self the least of all.
Page 89 - Remember we are to be good neighbors as well as neighbors ; and if the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain.
Page 243 - ... they are enemies to all men as well as to me. — Pray write to me when you can : if ever I can come to you, I will : if not, may Providence be our friend and our guard through this simple world, where nothing is valuable, bul sense and friendship.
Page 69 - I find it is the most difficult of any that I ever undertook. After I have invented one fable, and finished it, I despair of finding out another ; but I have a moral or two more, which I wish to write upon.
Page 137 - I had often postscripts from her in our friend's letters to me, and her part was sometimes longer than his, and they made up a great part of the little happiness I could have here.
Page 65 - Pope, who has always loved a domestic life from his youth. I was going to wish you had some little place that you could call your own, but, I profess I do not know you well enough to contrive any one system of life that would please you. You pretend to preach up riding and...
Page 165 - I wished vehemently to have seen him in a condition of living independent, and to have lived in perfect indolence the rest of our days together, the two most idle, most innocent, undesigning poets of our age. I now as vehemently wish you and I might walk into the grave together, by as slow steps as you please, but contentedly and cheerfully...
Page 200 - Lansdown is much at your service, laments the days that are past, and constantly drinks your health in champaign, as clear as your thoughts, and sparkling as your wit ; Lord and Lady Carteret, and my Lady Worsley all talk kindly of you, and join their wishes to mine for your coming among us. I request it of you to make my humble service acceptable to those friends of yours that are so good as to remember me. I am, sir, Your most obliged and faithful humble servant, M. PENDARVES.

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