Brown's Small Grammar Improved: The First Lines of English Grammar; Being a Brief Abstract of the Author's Larger Work, the "Institutes of English Grammar." Designed for Young Learners

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S. S. & W. Wood, 1856 - English language - 122 pages
 

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Page 67 - Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth ; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 114 - Thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt; thou hast cast out the heathen and planted it. Thou preparedst room before it, and didst cause it to take deep root, and it filled the land. The hills were covered with the shadow of it, and the boughs thereof were like the goodly cedars. She sent out her boughs unto the sea, and her branches unto the river.
Page 79 - And he shewed us how he had seen an angel in his house, which stood and said unto him, Send men to Joppa, and call for Simon, whose surname is Peter ; 14 Who shall tell thee words, whereby thou and all thy house shall be saved.
Page 90 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right ; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Page 12 - A word of one syllable is called a monosyllable ; a word of two syllables, a dissyllable ; a word of three syllables, a trissyllable ; and a word of four or more syllables, a polysyllable. DIPHTHONGS AND TRIPHTHONGS. A diphthong' is two vowels joined in one syllable ; as, ea in beat, ou in sound.
Page 113 - And the people with one accord gave heed unto those things which Philip spake, hearing and seeing the miracles which he did.
Page 33 - The heart is hard in nature, and unfit For human fellowship, as being void Of sympathy, and therefore dead alike To love and friendship both, that is not pleased With sight of animals enjoying life, Nor feels their happiness augment his own.
Page 12 - Our sons their fathers' failing language see, And such as Chaucer is, shall Dryden be.
Page 93 - Thus was Beauty sent from heaven, The lovely ministress of truth and good In this dark world : for truth and good are one, And Beauty dwells in them, and they in her, With like participation.
Page 73 - What time the daisy decks the green, Thy certain voice we hear; Hast thou a star to guide thy path, Or mark the rolling year? Delightful visitant ! with thee I hail the time of flowers, And hear the sound of music sweet, From birds among the bowers.

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