Inland Waterways: Their Relation to Transportation

Front Cover
American Academy of Political and Social Science, 1893 - Canals - 164 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - Viet. c. 31), s. 2, it is provided that " every railway company, canal company, and railway and canal company, shall, according to their respective powers, afford all reasonable facilities for the receiving and forwarding and delivering of traffic...
Page 27 - ... by the other, without any unreasonable delay, and without any such preference or advantage, or prejudice or disadvantage, as aforesaid, and so that no obstruction may be offered to the public desirous of using such railways or canals...
Page 132 - No other great power would under similar circumstances fail to assert a rightful control over a work so closely and vitally affecting its interest and welfare.
Page 27 - ... without any unreasonable delay, and without any such preference or advantage, or prejudice or disadvantage, as aforesaid, and so that no obstruction may be offered to the public, desirous of using such railways or canals or railways and canals as a continuous line of communication...
Page 51 - No railroad or other corporation, or the lessees, purchasers, or managers of any railroad corporation, shall consolidate the stock, property, or franchises of such corporation with, or lease or purchase the works or franchises of, or in any way control any railroad corporation owning or having under its control a parallel or competing line...
Page 132 - An interoceanic canal across the American Isthmus will essentially change the geographical relations between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States, and between the United States and the rest of the world.
Page 27 - ... no such company shall make or give any undue or unreasonable preference or advantage to or in favour of any particular person or company, or any particular description of traffic in any respect whatsoever...
Page 111 - Engineers, with his recommendations, and shall be transmitted by the Secretary of War to the House of Representatives, and are hereby ordered to be printed when so made.
Page 122 - OF ILLINOIS RIVER, ILLINOIS. The ultimate object of this improvement is to furnish a through route of transportation by water from the southern end of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River, of sufficient capacity for its navigation by the largest class of Mississippi Kiver steamboats that can reach the mouth of the Illinois River.
Page 132 - Our merely commercial interest in it is greater than that of all other countries, while its relations to our power and prosperity as a nation, to our means of defense, our unity, peace, and safety, are matters of paramount concern to the people of the United States.

Bibliographic information