Hints on Arboriculture in the Punjab, etc. [With illustrations.]

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Central Jail Press, 1873 - Arboriculture - 182 pages
 

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Page 97 - The quantity of timber that a tree forms, the amount and quality of its secretions, the brilliancy of its colours, the size of its flowers, and, in short, its whole beauty, depend upon the action of its branches and leaves, and their healthiness. The object of the pruner is to diminish the number of leaves and branches, whence it may be at once understood how delicate are the operations he has to practise, and how thorough a knowledge he ought to possess of all the laws which regulate the action...
Page 98 - If well directed, pruning is one of the most useful, and if ill directed, it is among the most mischievous operations that can take place upon a plant. The object of pruning is either to influence the production of flowers and fruit, or to augment the quantity of timber. " Pruning is nothing less than the removal of leaves. To cut off a branch in summer is evidently so ; and if the branch is naked, still its removal is the destruction of the part from which the leaves would have been produced had...
Page 98 - ... it is among the most mischievous, operations that can take place upon a plant. The object of pruning is either to influence the production of flowers and fruit, or to augment the quantity of timber." " Pruning is nothing less than the removal of leaves. To cut off a branch in summer is evidently so ; and if the branch is naked, still its removal is the destruction of the part from which leaves would have been produced had it been permitted to remain.
Page 98 - But, unfortunately, it does not happen that he who plants well always thins constantly ; it ia still more rare that stopping is thought of ; and so a maxim, one of the soundest in the whole system of forestry, cannot be observed. Hence pruning may be regarded as a necessary evil, to which the wise must submit because of the ignorant ; the careful to cure the evils inflicted by the careless.
Page 97 - Pruning may be defined as the removal of a part of a plant for the purpose of improving the remaining part or its product. Lindley, a noted English horticulturist who lived many years ago, said: " If well directed, pruning is one of the most useful; and if ill directed, it is among the most mischievous operations that can take place on a plant.
Page 98 - But unfortunately it does not happen that he who plants well always thins constantly; it is still more rare that stopping is thought of ; and so a maxim, one of the soundest in the whole system of Forestry, cannot be observed. Hence pruning may be regarded as a necessary evil, to which the wise must submit because of the ignorant; the careful to cure the evils inflicted by the careless,
Page 166 - I am convinced that this tree will yield the greatest net money return when once we begin to impregnate ' ; and I am disposed to endorse this, and to express the opinion that when the convenient situation of the forests, the easy reproduction of the tree, and the easy extraction of the timber are taken into consideration, it ought to be from properly creosoted long-leafed...
Page 28 - A good pla'n is to dip the roots into, a mixture of water and loan* immediately before planting. If water is to.

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