An Introduction to the History of Western Europe: With Supplement

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Ginn, 1918 - Europe - 714 pages
 

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Page xlviii - Our object now, as then, is to vindicate the principles of peace and justice in the life of the world as against selfish and autocratic power and to set up amongst the really free and self-governed peoples of the world such a concert of purpose and of action as will henceforth insure the observance of those principles.
Page 479 - If you aim at a Scottish Presbytery, it agreeth as well with monarchy as God and the deviL Then Jack, and Tom, and Will, and Dick, shall meet, and at their pleasure censure me and my council, and all our proceedings ; then Will shall stand up and say, It must be thus ; then Dick shall reply, Nay, marry, but we will have it thus.
Page 669 - One man draws out the wire, another straights it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on is a peculiar business, to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some manufactories, are all performed by distinct hands...
Page 50 - And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.
Page 254 - ... the truest lover, of a sinful man, that ever loved woman; and thou wert the kindest man that ever struck with sword. And thou wert the goodliest person that ever came among press of knights. And thou wert the meekest man, and the gentlest, that ever ate in hall among ladies. And thou wert the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.
Page lxiv - No peace can last, or ought to last, which does not recognize and accept the principle that governments derive all their just powers from the consent of the governed, and that no right anywhere exists to hand peoples about from sovereignty to sovereignty as if they were property.
Page lxxvi - Any war or threat of war, whether immediately affecting any of the Members of the League or not, is hereby declared a matter of concern to the whole League, and the League shall take any action that may be deemed wise and effectual to safeguard the peace of nations.
Page 486 - Parliament, composed of both houses, was assembled, which welcomed a messenger from the king and solemnly resolved that, " according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by king, lords, and commons.
Page 472 - It is atheism and blasphemy to dispute what God can do; good Christians content themselves with His will revealed in His Word, so it is presumption and high contempt in a subject to dispute what a King can do, or say that a King cannot do this or that, but | rest in that which is the King's will revealed in his law.
Page 545 - WHEN the right sense of historical proportion is more fully developed in men's minds, the name of Voltaire will stand out like the names of the great decisive movements in the European advance, like the Revival of Learning, or the Reformation.

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