Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" The true foundation on which the administration of international law must rest is that the rules which are to govern are those which arise from mutual interest and utility, from a sense of the inconveniences which would result from a contrary doctrine,... "
Fur-seal Arbitration: Oral Argument of James C. Carter ... on Behalf of the ... - Page 106
by James Coolidge Carter - 1893 - 379 pages
Full view - About this book

Dissertations on the Questions which Arise from the Contrariety of the ...

Samuel Livermore - Conflict of laws - 1828 - 172 pages
...nations have admitted the extension of personal statutes. It has arisen from a sort of necessity, and from a sense of the inconveniences which would result from a contrary doctrine, by which the state and condition of a man, his capacity or incapacity, would change with every change...
Full view - About this book

The American Jurist and Law Magazine, Volume 11

Law - 1834
...commenting upon the rules laid down by Boullenois, Huberus, Hertius, and others, he proceeds to say, that ' The true foundation, on which the administration of...in order that justice may be done to us in return. This is the ground upon which Rodembourg puts it. Quid, igitur, (says he) ret in causa est, quod personalia...
Full view - About this book

The American Jurist and Law Magazine, Volume 1

Law - 1829
...personal statutes. It has arisen from a sort 140 Livermore 's Dissertations. [Jan. of necessity, and from a sense of the inconveniences which would result from a contrary doctrine, by which the state and condition of a man, his capacity or incapacity, would change with every change...
Full view - About this book

American Quarterly Review, Volume 17

Robert Walsh - American literature - 1835
...view, are incompatible with its own safety or happiness, or conscientious regard to justice and duty. ' The true foundation on which the administration of...from mutual interest and utility, from a sense of the inconveniencies which would result from a contrary doctrine, and from a sort of moral necessity to...
Full view - About this book

American Quarterly Review, Volume 17

Robert Walsh - American literature - 1835
...govern are those which arise from mutual interest and utility, from a sense of the inconveniencies which would result from a contrary doctrine, and from...in order that justice may be done to us in return. Mutual utility presupposes that the interest of all nations is consulted, and not that of one only....
Full view - About this book

A Practical Treatise of the Law of Marriage and Divorce: Containing Also the ...

Leonard Shelford - Divorce - 1841 - 519 pages
...prejudice that must arise to important interests of another country from a refusal to observe it.(a) The true foundation on which the administration of...in order that justice may be done to. us in return. (6) But the nature and extent and utility of this recognition of foreign laws respecting the state...
Full view - About this book

Commentaries on the Conflict of Laws: Foreign and Domestic, in Regard to ...

Joseph Story - Commentaries - 1846 - 1068 pages
...rule is wrong. ^ 25. The true foundation, on which the administration of international law must zest, is, that the rules, which are to govern, are those,...justice, in order that justice may be done to us in return.1 This is the ground upon which Rodenburg puts it. Quid, igitur (says he) rei in causd est,...
Full view - About this book

Commentaries on Universal Public Law

George Bowyer - Jurisprudence - 1854 - 387 pages
...mutual intercourse between civilized nations. "The true foundation," as Mr. Justice Story observes, "on which the administration of international law...in order that justice may be done to us in return. This is the ground on which Rodenburg puts it.u" The American jurist states this proposition too generally,...
Full view - About this book

Two Introductory Lectures on the Science of International Law

Travers Twiss - International law - 1856 - 60 pages
...praejudicetur." (De Conflictu Legum, 1. 1 . tit. 3. 2.) The rules which are to govern such questions are those which arise from mutual interest and utility, from a sense of the inconvenience which would result from a contrary doctrine, and from a sort of moral necessity to do...
Full view - About this book

A Treatise on the Rules which Govern the Interpretation and Application of ...

Theodore Sedgwick - Constitutional history - 1857 - 712 pages
...those laws are prejudicial to the rights of other nations or to those of the subjects." And again,J " The true foundation on which the administration of...from mutual interest and utility, from a sense of the inconvenience which would result from a contrary doctrine, and from a sort of moral necessity to do...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF