The Modes of Scepticism: Ancient Texts and Modern Interpretations

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Cambridge University Press, May 23, 1985 - Philosophy - 203 pages
The Modes of Scepticism is one of the most important and influential of all ancient philosophical texts. The texts made an enormous impact on Western thought when they were rediscovered in the 16th century and they have shaped the whole future course of Western philosophy. Despite their importance, the Modes have been little discussed in recent times. This book translates the texts and supplies them with a discursive commentary, concentrating on philosophical issues but also including historical material. The book will be of interest to professional scholars and philosophers but its clear and non-technical style makes it intelligible to beginners and the interested layman.
 

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Contents

Sceptical Philosophy
4
Scepticism in Ancient Philosophy
10
The Ten Modes
19
Humans and Other Animals
31
Human Variations
54
The Senses
66
Circumstances
78
Places and Positions
99
The Common and the Rare
146
Philo and Diogenes on the Modes
172
The Eight Modes against Causal Explanation Sextus PHI 1805
181
The Five Modes of Agrippa Sextus PHI 1649
182
The Two Modes Sextus PHI 1789
183
Textual Notes
184
Glossary
190
Bibliography
192

Mixtures
110
Quantities
119
Relativity
128

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About the author (1985)

Jonathan Barnes has a BSc in Biological Sciences from the University of Sussex. He has been writing since the age of 21 and under a pseudonym has published four novels. He cam across the Bates method in 1983 and, as a wearer of glasses himself, decided to investigate it from a biologist's viewpoint. He found it logical and consistent, and since practising it has been able to improve his eyesight and discard his glasses.

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