The Analogy of Religion: Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and Course of Nature. To which are Added Two Brief Dissertations on Personal Identity, and the Nature of Virtue. With a Life of the Author, Copious Notes, and an Ample Index

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Hunt & Eaton, 1875 - Analogy (Religion) - 395 pages
 

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Page 259 - Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things, as Moses was admonished of God when he was about to make the tabernacle: for. See, saith he, that thou make all things according to the pattern showed to thee in the mount.
Page 81 - I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh; when your fear cometh as desolation, and your destruction cometh as a whirlwind; when distress and anguish cometh upon you. Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me...
Page 81 - How long, ye simple ones, will ye love simplicity? and the scorners delight in their scorning, and fools hate knowledge? Turn you at my reproof: behold, I will pour out my spirit unto you, I will make known my words unto you.
Page 37 - Origen* has with singular sagacity observed, that "he who believes the Scripture to have proceeded from him who is the Author of nature, may well expect to find the same sort of difficulties in it as are found in the constitution of nature.
Page 259 - For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away sins.
Page 314 - And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed; and the kingdom shall not be left to other people, but it shall break in pieces and consume all these kingdoms, and it shall stand for ever.
Page 17 - There are two ways in which the subject of morals may be treated. One begins from inquiring into the abstract relations of things: the other from a matter of fact, namely, what the particular nature of man is, its several parts, their economy or constitution ; from whence it proceeds to determine what course of life it is, which is correspondent to this whole nature.
Page 259 - For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices, which they offered year by year continually, make the comers thereunto perfect.
Page 30 - It is come, I know not how, to be taken for granted, by many persons, that Christianity is not so much as a subject of inquiry , but that it is, now at length, discovered to be fictitious.
Page 317 - It is a light thing that thou shouldest be my servant To raise up the tribes of Jacob, And to restore the preserved of Israel: I will also give thee for a light to the Gentiles, That thou mayest be my salvation unto the end of the earth.

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