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A LOVER

OF

WATER.

excitement of the struggle, blue-bird and robin. His asked : “ What ails you, my low bass chimes with the child ?"

orchestra of song

in the O mother!" she exclaim- grass and on the trees; and ed, “I wanted so much to his green back is a reminder take one of the peaches; of what is needed to pay for but I thought I would first the Banner. His round, full ask God if he had any ob- eyes are more fully developjection.”

ed than his brain-a fact which may account for his

frequently taking a leap in The frog is a hydropath.

the dark. He may see furHe has faith in water as a

ther than those who dare not

follow him in his plunge into beverage, and he uses it freely for bathing purposes.

the water.-Youth's TemHe believes in the sitz-bath,

perance Banner, the plunge-bath, the douche

SWEARING REPROVED, bath, the spray-bath, the shower-bath, and the foun- “HOWARD, the philanthrotain-bath. He is a spry, pist, was standing one day jolly fellow; and although he near the door of a printing keeps late hours, and sings office, when he heard some from sunset until daybreak, dreadful oaths and he is never indebted to stim- from a public-house oppoulants for his song and site. Buttoning his pocket cheerful merits, In the up before he went into the language of one of our hu- street, he said to the workmourists : “He can swim men near him: “I always faster and leap higher, dive do this when I hear men deeper, and come up drier swear, as I think that any than the most active rum

one who take God's drinker. In the early spring, name in vain can also steal, his voice, though not so mu- or do anything else that is sical, is almost as welcome bad.” There may be men -when not too

near the who swear and would not house--as the voice of the ) steal, and there may be men

curses

can

course.

who steal and do not swear; sect sent its feeble offspring but we should not care to to perform. One alone trust either sort. One thing could have little power, it is is certain : if the swearer is true, but millions were mardishonest in nothing else, he shalled, and all the skill of is in this one thing—that he man could not stay their takes from God the honour which is his due. Swearers Such is the power of little are not apt to think much of sins. Perform the same God, though-they-so often act over, for even two or use his name.

three times in succession, A profane coachman, point- and the habit is formed.ing to one of his horses, said Young People's Helper. to a pious traveller : "That

LIVING AND DYING. horse, sir, knows when I

Did you ever hear about swear at him.”

“ Yes," re

John Newton, the celebrated plied the traveller, “and so

English preacher?" says does your Maker."

The

Cousin Carrie, coachman felt the rebuke,

“ John Newton, one eveand immediately became

ning at a party, mentioned silent.

that a young girl had died. LITTLE SINS.

And how did she die? In a Carolina forest of a asked a young lady. thousand acres you can “ You have forgotten," scarcely find a tree that is replied the good man, “to not dead and crumbling to ask a far more important decay. No fire has swept question." over it, no lightning scathed “Why, sir, what can be those naked, bleaching pines. more important than how This ruin was wrought by a

one dies?little insect's larvæ, no lar- “ Yes," said he, “it is far ger than a grain of rice. more important how one What a hundred axes and lives."

accomplish by And so it is. If we live years of hard labour, this well, God will take care that seemingly insignificant in- we die well.

AROUND THE THRONE.

MATTHEWS.

Around the throne of God, in heaven, Thousands of

children stand ; Children whose sins are all forgiven, A

họ - ly hap-py

band, Singing

Glory,

Glory,

Glory be to God on high.
In flowing robes of spotless white,

See every one arrayed,
Dwelling in everlasting light,
And joys that never fade.

Singing glory, &c.
What brought them to that world above,

That heaven so bright and fair,
Where all is peace, and joy and love,
How came those children there?

Singing glory, &c.
Because the Saviour shed his blood,

To wash away their sin ;
Bathed in that pure and precious blood,
Behold them white and clean.

Singing glory, &c.
On earth they sought the Saviour's grace,

On earth they loved his name;
So now they see his blessed face,
And stand before the Lamb.

Singing glory, &c.

Poetry.

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GOING HOME. “Will you come with me, my pretty one?”

I asked a little child; “Will you come with me and gather flowers?”

She looked at me, and smiled.
Then, in a low, sweet, gentle voice,

She said, “ I cannot come;
I must not leave this narrow path,

For I am going home.”
“But will you not?” I asked again ;

“The sun is shining bright, And you might twine a lily wreath

To carry home at night;
And I could show you pleasant things
If you would co me :
But still she answered as before,

“No; I am going home.”
“ But look, my child : the fields are green,

And ’neath the leafy trees
Children are playing merrily,

Or resting at their ease.
Does it not hurt your tender feet,

This stony path to tread?"
“ Sometimes; but I am going home!

Once more she sweetly said.

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My Father bade me keep this path,

Nor ever turn aside.
The road which leads away from him

Is very smooth and wide ;

The fields are fresh, and cool, and green;

Pleasant the shady trees;
But those around my own dear home 1

Are lovelier far than these.
I must not loiter on the road,

For I have far to go;
And I should like to reach the door

Before the sun is low.
I must not stay; but will you not-

Oh, will you not come too ?”

THE PILGRIM.
O pilgrim! weary with the road,
And burdened with thy heavy load,
A place of rest and safety see
“Knock, and it shall be opened thee."
But will they let a wanderer in
Who bears a load of shame and sin?
Yes, fear not; guilty though thou be,

Knock, and it shall be opened thee.”
Friendless and homeless, I before
Have knocked in vain at many a door.-
Fear not, this home to all is free-
“ Knock, and it shall be opened thee.”
This is the home where Christ abides.
Where He for all a home provides ;
All may for refuge hither flee-
“Knock, and it shall be opened thee."
Many have come from day to day,
And none have e'er been sent away;
None who believe the words they see-
“ Knock, and it shall be opened thee."
O may a little child draw near,
And find a friend and welcome here?
Will Jesus look on one like me?-
Yes; “ Knock, it shall be opened thee."

Rev. J. D. Burns.

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