Peerage of England: Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of England, Now Existing... Their Descents and Collateral Lines: Their Births, Marriages, and Issues... Deaths, Places of Burial, Monuments, Epitaphs... Also Their Paternal Coats of Arms, Crests, Supporters and Mottos, Volume 2

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Page 374 - In a word, he was a man, that whoever shall, after him, deserve best of the English nation, he can never think himself undervalued, when he shall hear, that his courage, virtue, and fidelity, is laid in the balance with, and compared to, that of the lord Capel.
Page 442 - was exceedingly disposed to please the king and to do him service." "It could never be hoped," he observes elsewhere, "that more sober or dispassionate men would ever meet together in that place, or fewer who brought ill purposes with them.
Page 428 - I'll run the hazard of being thought anything rather than a rash inconsiderate man. And to tell you my thoughts without disguise, I am now so much in love with a retired life, that I am never like to be fond of making a bustle in the world again.
Page 265 - ' and one of the knights of the shire for the county of Kent in 18 Jac. I.
Page 91 - Blessed be God's glorious name for ever and ever. Amen. " ' Let the whole earth be filled with His glory. Amen.
Page 286 - How desirous we are to contribute to the obtaining the peace and happiness of our subjects without effusion of blood; and how far we are from desiring to recover wha.t belongs to us by a war, if it can be otherwise done, will appear to you by the enclosed declaration ; which, together with this our...
Page 217 - He was a person of great courage, honour, and fidelity, and not well known till his evening ; having, in the ease, and plenty, and luxury of that too happy time, indulged to himself, with that licence which was then thought necessary to great fortunes : but from the beginning of these distractions, as if he had been awakened out of a lethargy, he never proceeded with a lukewarm temper.
Page 333 - He gave thanks to the lords for their open trial, and cried mercy of the duke of Northumberland, the marquis of Northampton, and the earl of Pembroke for his...
Page 410 - Gules, on a bend between six cross crosslets fitchy, argent, an escutcheon or, charged with a demi-lion rampant pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure, flory...
Page 122 - ... to the dignity of a Baron of this Realm, by the title of Lord Ossulston, Baron of Ossulston.

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