The Lady's Magazine, Or, Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to Their Use and Amusement

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Robinson and Roberts, 1790 - English literature
 

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Page 369 - Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do: and, behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and there was no profit under the sun.
Page 88 - ... or the like; this is all according to the due course of things: but when I behold a lump of deformity and diseases both in body and mind, smitten with pride...
Page 133 - ... mind and memory, do make and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made.
Page 226 - Mr. Hartop would have declined receiving it, but the pride of the poet was equal to his genius, and he sent the money with an angry letter, which was found among the curious possessions of this venerable old man.
Page 159 - So often fills his arms ; so often draws His lonely footsteps at the silent hour, To pay the mournful tribute of his tears * Oh ! he will tell thee, that the wealth of worlds Should ne'er seduce his bosom to forego That sacred hour...
Page 347 - ... as have been broken off, which extends as far under water as the eye can reach. Here the forms of the pillars -are apparent : these are of three, four, five, six, and seven sides, but the numbers of five and six are by much the most prevalent.
Page 138 - ... contrived to get Mr. Partis to buy him a coat, and make him a present of it. Thus, formerly having had a good coat, then a bad one, and, at last, no coat at all — he was kind enough to accept one from a neighbor.
Page 77 - ... to call his own. A couple of beds, a couple of chairs, a table, and an old woman, were all his furniture ; and he moved them about at a minute's warning. Of all these...
Page 445 - WHOE'ER with curious eye has rang'd Through Ovid's tales, has feen How Jove, incens'd, to monkies chang'd A tribe of worthlefs men. Repentant foon th' offending race Intreat the injur'd pow'r, To give them back the human face, And reafon's aid reftore. Jove, footh'd at length, his ear inclin'd, And granted half their pray'r ; But t' other half he bade the wind Difperfe in empty air.
Page 282 - Mexico; but this is represented to have been done by him on the supposition that nothing but the ignorance of the rights of Spain encouraged the individuals of other nations to come to...

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