The Novels and Tales of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume 16

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Contents

Windy Nights
9
Travel
10
Singing
12
Looking Forward
13
A Good Play
14
Where Go the Boats?
15
Aunties Skirts
16
The Land of Countbrpanb
17
The Land of Nod
18
My Shadow
19
System
20
A Good Boy
21
Escape at Bedtime
22
Marching Song
23
The Cow
24
Happy Thought
25
The Wind
26
Keepsake Mill
27
Good and Bad Children
29
Foreign Children
30
The Suns Travels
31
The Lamplighter
32
My Bed is a Boat
33
The Moon
34
The Swing
35
Time to Rise
36
Lookingglass River
37
Fairy Bread
39
From a Railway Carriage
40
Wintertime
41
The Hayloft
42
Farewell to the Farm
43
Northwest Passage
44
Shadow March
45
In Port
46
THE CHILD ALONE
47
The Unseen Playmate
49
My Ship and I
50
My Kingdom
51
Picturebooks in Winter
53
My Treasures
54
Block City
55
The Land of Storybooks
57
Armies in the Fire
59
The Little Land
60
GARDEN DAYS
63
Night and Day
65
Nest Eggs
67
The Flowers
69
Summer Sun
70
The Dumb Soldier
71
Autumn Fires
73
The Gardener
74
Historical Associations
75
ENVOYS
77
To Willie and Henrietta
79
To My Mother
80
To Auntie
81
To Minnie
82
To My Namechild
85
To Any Reader
87
PAGE
92
In English
95
Go Little Book
97
The Gauger Walked
98
On the Great Streams
100
It is the Season
102
A Naked House a Naked Moor
104
Far from the Loud Sea Beaches
106
Friend in my Mountainside Demesne
107
A Picture Frame for you to Fill
109
A Lover of the Moorland Bare
110
The Unfathomable Sea
111
Youth now Flees
112
Even in the Bluest Noonday of July
114
I Sit and Wait
115
Dear Andrew
117
In Ancient Tales O Friend
119
The Year Runs through her Phases
122
Who Comes tonight?
124
O Mother Lay your Hand on my Brow
138
Yet O Stricken Heart
139
Peace and her Huge Invasion
140
With Half a Heart
142
I Am a Kind of Farthing Dip
143
Sing Clearlier Muse
144
The Bed Was Made
145
We Travelled in the Print of Olden Wars
146
For Love of Lovely Words
147
THE PARALLEL Here All is Sunny
148
My House I Say
149
My Body Which My Dungeon is
150
Say not of me that weakly I declined
152
In Scots
153
Table op Common Scottish Vowel Sounds
154
Far yont Amang the Years to be
155
Frae Nirly Nippin Easlan Breeze
157
When Aince Aprile has Fairly Come
160
A MILE AN A BITTOCK
161
The Clinkumclank o Sabbath Bells
163
O I Wad Like to Ken
169
Its Rainin Weets the Gairden Sod
171
My Bonny Man the Warld its True
173
Its Strange that God Should Fash to Frame
176
Dear Thamson Class Whaureer I Gang
178
The Lord Himselin Former Days
181
In Mony a Foreign Pairt Ive Been
184
Late in the Nicht
188
Of athe ills That Flesh can Fear
191
By Lyne and Tyne by Thames and Tees
193
Its an Owercome Sooth for Age an Youth
196
Book 111
197
Give to me the Life I Love
199
I Once Only by the Garden Gate
201
II To the Heart of Youth
202
I In Dreams Unhappy
203
II She Rested by the Broken Brook
204
The Infinite Shining Heavens
205
Plain as the Glistering Planets
206
To You let Snow and Roses
208
LET BEAUTY AWAKE
209
Know not How it is With You
210
Will Make You Brooches and Toys
211
and Reedy Island
212
The Cock shall Crow
214
Son of my Womans Body
215
Bright is the Ring of Words
216
In the Highlands in the Country Places
217
Home no more Home
218
In the Beloved Hour
220
I Knew thee Strong
221
The Morning DrumCall
223
Have Trod
224
He Hears with Gladdened Heart
225
Farewell Fair Day
226
God if this were enough
227
Trusty Dusky Vivid True
229
In Rigorous Hours
230
The Stormy Evening Closes
231
Since Long Ago
232
The Silver Ship my King
234
Forth from her Land
235
To see the Infinite Pity
236
I Knew a Silver Head
237
Long must Elapse Ere You
238
Resign the Rhapsody
240
Do you Remember
241
The Tropics Vanish
243
1 Heard the Pulse
245
Let us who Part
247
In all the Grove
252
As the Single Pang of the Blow
257
Let now your Soul
259
We Uncommiserate Pass
260
Once More I Saw Him
261
XL1V Sing Me a Song
262
Blows the Wind Today
264
The Embers of the Day
265
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Page 129 - REQUIEM UNDER the wide and starry sky, Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will This be the verse you grave for me : Here he lies where he longed to be ; Home is the sailor, home from sea, And the hunter home from the hill.
Page 25 - The world is so full of a number of things, I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings.
Page 35 - THE SWING HOW do you like to go up In a swing, Up in the air so blue ? Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing Ever a child can do...
Page 211 - I WILL make you brooches and toys for your delight Of bird-song at morning and star-shine at night. I will make a palace fit for you and me Of green days in forests and blue days at sea.
Page 1 - In winter I get up at night And dress by yellow candle-light. In summer, quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day. I have to go to bed and see The birds still hopping on the tree, Or hear the grown-up people's feet Still going past me in the street. And does it not seem hard to you, 10 When all the sky is clear and blue, And I should like so much to play To have to go to bed by day?
Page 17 - WHEN I was sick and lay a-bed, I had two pillows at my head, And all my toys beside me lay To keep me happy all the day. And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills; And sometimes sent my ships in fleets AH up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about.
Page 216 - BRIGHT is the ring of words When the right man rings them, Fair the fall of songs When the singer sings them. Still they are carolled and said — On wings they are carried — After the singer is dead And the maker buried.
Page 15 - WHERE GO THE BOATS? DARK brown is the river, Golden is the sand. It flows along forever, With trees on either hand. Green leaves a-floating, Castles of the foam, Boats of mine a-boating — Where will all come home?
Page 145 - THE bed was made, the room was fit, By punctual eve the stars were lit; The air was still, the water ran, No need was there for maid or man, When we put up, my ass and I, At God's green caravanserai.
Page 19 - And what can be the use of him is more than I can see. He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head; And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed. The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow — Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow; For he sometimes shoots up taller like an India-rubber ball, And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all. He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play, And can only make a fool of me in...

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