The Perils of the Nation: An Appeal to the Legislature, the Clergy, and Higher and Middle Classes

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Seeley, Burnside and Seeley, 1844 - Great Britain - 439 pages
 

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Page 182 - If there be among you a poor man of one of thy brethren within any of thy gates in thy land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not harden thine heart, nor shut thine hand from thy poor brother : 8 'But thou shalt open thine hand wide unto him, and shalt surely lend him sufficient for his need, in that which he wanteth.
Page 250 - Will you be ready with all faithful diligence to banish and drive away all erroneous and strange doctrines, contrary to God's word, and to use both public and private monitions and exhortations, as well to the sick, as to the whole within your cures, as need shall require and occasion be given ? Answer. I will, the Lord being my helper.
Page 110 - Woe unto them that join house to house, that lay field to field, till there be no place, that they may be placed alone in the midst of the earth...
Page 140 - For the oppression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, now will I arise, saith the Lord; I will set him in safety from him that puffeth at him.
Page 327 - WILL you then faithfully exercise yourself in the same holy Scriptures, and call upon God by prayer, for the true understanding of the same...
Page 172 - Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate : for the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them.
Page 168 - Shall I not visit for these things? saith the Lord: and shall not my soul be avenged on such a nation as this?
Page 157 - The gaping chinks admitted every blast; the leaning chimneys had lost half their original height; the rotten rafters were evidently misplaced; while in many instances the thatch, yawning in some parts to admit the wind and wet, and in all utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protection from the weather, looked more like the top of a dunghill than a cottage.
Page 51 - Pit; I have to trap without a light, and I'm scared; I go at four and sometimes half-past three in the morning, and come out at five and half-past; I never go to sleep. Sometimes I sing when I've light, but not in the dark; I dare not sing then.
Page 183 - Thou shalt surely give him, and thine heart shall not be grieved when thou givest unto him : because that for this thing the LORD thy God shall bless thee in all thy works, and in all that thou puttest thine hand unto. For the poor shall never cease out of the land : therefore I command thee, saying, Thou shalt open thine hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, and to thy needy, in thy land.

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