Slaves and Slavery in Ancient Greek Comic Drama

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Ben Akrigg, Rob Tordoff
Cambridge University Press, Jan 31, 2013 - History - 271 pages
How did audiences of ancient Greek comedy react to the spectacle of masters and slaves? If they were expected to laugh at a slave threatened with a beating by his master at one moment but laugh with him when they bantered familiarly at the next, what does this tell us about ancient Greek slavery? This volume presents ten essays by leading specialists in ancient Greek literature, culture and history, exploring the changing roles and representations of slaves in comic drama from Aristophanes at the height of the Athenian Empire to the New Comedy of Menander and the Hellenistic World. The contributors focus variously on individual comic dramas or on particular historical periods, analysing a wide range of textual, material-culture and comparative data for the practices of slavery and their representation on the ancient Greek comic stage.
 

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Contents

slaves and slavery in ancient Greek comedy
1
Chapter 2 Slaves and politics in early Aristophanic comedy
63
Chapter 3 Slavery drama and the alchemy of identity in Aristophanes
76
Chapter 4 Slaves in the fragments of Old Comedy
91
Chapter 5 Aristophanes slaves and history
111
the comic slave in Greek art
124
the banality of violence
144
the social networking of slaves in Menander
159
Chapter 9 Sex slaves in New Comedy
173
from vase to stage?
197
slaves citizens and inbetweens
209
References
228
Index locorum
248
General index
262
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About the author (2013)

Ben Akrigg is Assistant Professor of Greek History at the University of Toronto. His principal research interest is the economic and social history of classical Greece.

Rob Tordoff is Assistant Professor of Humanities at York University, Toronto. His research focuses on Aristophanes, literary theory, social and cultural history and the modern reception of ancient Greek literature.

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