The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Front Cover
Talboys and Wheeler, 1825
 

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Contents

The necessity of proportioning punishments to crimes
39
The sequel of Hymenasuss courtship
44
The young traders attempt at politeness
49
The advantages of living in a garret
54
The narrowness of fame
60
Tranquillas account of her lovers opposed to Hymenals
64
The history of Almamoulin the son of Nouradin
70
The dangers of imitation The impropriety of imitating Spenser
76
A criticism on the English historians
80
The young trader turned gentleman
84
The ladys misery in a summer retirement
89
125 The difficulty of defining comedy Tragick and comick sentiments confounded
93
The universality of cowardice The impropriety of extorting praise The impertinence of an astronomer
98
Diligence too soon relaxed Necessity of perseverance
103
Numr Page 128 Anxiety universal The unhappiness of a wit and a fine lady 107 129 The folly of cowardice and inactivity Ill 130 The history of a be...
116
Desire of gain the general passion
119
The difficulty of educating a young nobleman
125
The miseries of a beauty defaced
130
Idleness an anxious and miserable state
134
The folly of annual retreats into the country
138
The meanness and mischief of indiscriminate dedication
143
The necessity of literary courage
147
Original characters to be found in the country The character of Mrs Busy
152
A critical examination of Samson Agonistes
157
The criticism continued
162
Num Faoe 165 The impotence of wealth The visit of Serotinus to the place of
165
The danger of attempting wit in conversation The character of Papilius
172
An account of squire Bluster
173
The criterions of plagiarism
178
The difficulty of raising reputation The various species of de tractors
184
Petty writers not to be despised
188
An account of an author travelling in quest of his own character The uncertainty of fame
192
The courtiers esteem of assurance
196
The cruelty of parental tyranny
201
Benefits not always entitled to gratitude
206
Adversity useful to the acquisition of knowledge
211
The climactericks of the mind
215
Criticism on epistolary writings
220
The treatment incurred by loss of fortune
224
The inefficacy of genius without learning
229
The usefulness of advice The danger of habits The necessity of reviewing life
234
The laws of writing not always indisputable Reflections on tragi comedy 239
241
The scholars complaint of hisown bashfulness
243
Favour not easily gained by the poor
283
The marriage of Hymenaus and Tranquilla
287
Poetry debased by mean expressions An example from Shake speare
291
Labour necessary to excellence
295
The history of Misella debauched by her relation
299
Numb Pads
303
Misellas description of the life of a prostitute
304
The effect of sudden riches upon the manners
309
Unreasonable fears of pedantry
313
The mischiefs of unbounded raillery History of Dicaculus
317
The majority are wicked
322
Directions to authors attacked by criticks The various degrees of critical perspicacity
326
An account of a club of antiquaries
329
Many advantages not to be enjoyed together
333
The awkward merriment of a student
337
The study of life not to be neglected for the sake of books
341
The history of an adventurer in lotteries
345
The history of Leviculus the fortunehunter
350
The influence of envy and interest compared
354
The subject of essays often suggested by chance Chance equally prevalent in other affairs
358
The prohibition of reveuge justifiable by reason The meanness of regulating our conduct by the opinions of men
362
Anningait and Ajut a Greenland history
367
The history of Anningait and Ajut concluded
371
Favour often gained with little assistance from understanding
375
The mischiefs of falsehood The character of Turpicula
379
The history of Abouzaid the son of Morad
383
The busy life of a young lady
387
Love unsuccessful without riches
392
The authors art of praising himself
396
A young noblemans progress in politeness
400
A young noblemans introduction to the knowledge of the town
405
Human opinions mutable The hopes of youth fallacious
409
The history of a legacyhunter
413
The legacyhunters history concluded
417
The virtues of Rabbi Abrahams magnet
422
Aspers complaint of the insolence of Prospero Unpoliteness not always the effect of pride
427
The importance of punctuality
432
The different acceptations of poverty Cynicks and Monks not poor
436
The history of ten days of Seged emperour of Ethiopia
444
The art of living at the cost of others
452
The Ramblers reception His design
461
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Page 164 - So much I feel my genial spirits droop, My hopes all flat, nature within me seems In all her functions weary of herself ; My race of glory run, and race of shame, And I shall shortly be with them that rest.
Page 289 - You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry " Hold, hold !
Page 166 - The Sun to me is dark And silent as the Moon, When she deserts the night Hid in her vacant interlunar cave. Since light so necessary is to life, And almost life itself, if it be true That light is in the Soul, She all in every part; why was the sight To such a tender ball as the eye confined?
Page 165 - Let there be light, and light was over all; Why am I thus bereaved thy prime decree? The sun to me is dark And silent as the moon, When she deserts the night Hid in her vacant interlunar cave.
Page 23 - What better can we do, than, to the place Repairing where he judged us, prostrate fall Before him reverent, and there confess Humbly our faults, and pardon beg, with tears Watering the ground, and with our sighs the air Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeign'd and humiliation meek?
Page 238 - Is it not certain that the tragic and comic affections have been moved alternately with equal force, and that no plays have oftener filled the eye with tears, and the breast with palpitation than those which are variegated with interludes of mirth ? I do not however think it safe to judge of works of genius merely by the event.
Page 160 - He tugg'd, he shook, till down they came and drew The whole roof after them, with burst of thunder Upon the heads of all who sat beneath, Lords, ladies, captains, counsellors...
Page 164 - No strength of man or fiercest wild beast could withstand ; Who tore the lion...
Page 158 - But will arise and his great name assert : Dagon must stoop, and shall e're long receive Such a discomfit, as shall quite despoil him Of all these boasted Trophies won on me, And with confusion blank his Worshippers.
Page 289 - ... we do not immediately conceive that any crime of importance is to be committed with a knife ; or who does not, at last, from the long habit of connecting a knife with sordid offices, feel aversion rather than terror...

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