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And after my manner, I alter ever, when I add. So that nothing is
finished, till all be finished.--Letter of Sir Francis Bacon to år.
Tobie Matthew, dated Graies Inn, Feb. 27, 1610.

Edited by EDWARD ARBER, F.S.A., eta,

LECTURER IN ENGLISH LITERATURE, ETC.,

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, LONDON.

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III. OF THE COLOURS OF GOOD AND EVIL,

(A Preliminary Note.

132-134]

OF THE COLOURS OF GOOD AND Evil, A fragment.

135-154

Contents.

137

CE : (Preface].

I. Since all parties or sects challenge the pre-eminence of the first

place to themselves, that which all the rest with one consent

give the second place, seems to be better than the others : for

every one seems to take the first place out of self-zeal but to

give the second where it is really due.

139

2. That kind is altogether best, whose excellence or pre-eminence

is best.

140

3. That which hath a relation to truth is greater than that which

refers to opinion: but the measure and trial of that which

belongs to opinion is this: It is that which a man would not

do, if he thought it would not be known..

141

4. That which keeps a matter safe and entire is good; but what is

destitute and unprovided of retreat is bad: for whereas all

ability of acting is good, not to be able to withdraw one's self is

a kind of impotency.

142

5. That which consists of more parts, and those divisible, is greater,

and more one than what is made up of fewer: for all things

when they are looked upon piece-meal seem greater; when also

a plurality of parts more strongly if they be in no certain

order; for it then resembles infinity, and hinders the compre-

hending of them.

143

6. That whose privation (or the want of which) is good, is in itself

evil; that whose privation (or the want whereof) is an evil, is

in itself good.

7. What is near to good, is good; what is at a distance from good,

4259

581

160

2. Of Wisdom for a Man's Self. 182

14. Of Goodness and Goodness of

Nature,

188

121

125

11. Of Friendship

2 Of Nobility.

198

208

Iterature as well as Dress has its fashions, its varying modes

of expressing the Taste of the day. Since printed English books have been, one kind of Subject or one Style

of writing, rather than all others, has been in favour both with writers and readers : just as it was consonant with the intelligence and movements, the social, political, and religious life of the Age. This Subject or Style has maintained its pre-eminence until some change in the national life or the advent of some new strong writer has created interest in a fresh topicor occasioned delight through some new phase of expression. So that as time wore on, not only have books multiplied immensely, but the Literature has vastly increased in species, classes, and kinds of writings. To quote a few late examples. In the last century, the existing style of Essay writing was initiated by Addison and Steele; English Romances of Travel were founded in De Foe's Robinson Crusoe; our earliest modern Novels were written by Richardson, Fielding, and Goldsmith; and Dr. Johnson compiled the first of our present recognized Dictionaries. Quite recently also, we have seen that fungus variety of Fiction—the Sensation Novel-live its day and

To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.'

pass away.

2. Within the century since Caxton had established the use of printing in England, there had come into vogue ALLEGORICAL VERSE in Stephen Hawes' Paftime of Pleasure, which kind of composition had recently been revived in Spenser's Faery Queene. Another class of poetry, PASTORAL VERSE, had been represented by Barclay's Egloges, Spenser's Shepheardes Calender, Lodge's Phillis, Watson's Melibæus (in English), and Barnfield's Affectionate Shep. heard. The Reforming spirit sometimes had used the lash of SATIRICAL VERSE, as in Roy's Rede me and be nott wrothe, and the many unprinted Ballad Invectives and Complaints that have come down to us. Then Classical literature had come in like a flood, and there had arisen a school of severe Criticism in Greek, Latin, and English, including such scholars as Sir J. Cheke, Walter Haddon, and Roger Ascham. Then there had been the almost universal habit among Gentlemen of SONNETTING, of which no one knows the entire existing remains. Then had arisen the fashion of PLAYS : Comedies first, arising out of the Miracle, Mystery, and Morality plays : afterwards Tragedy, in imitation of the Dramas of Seneca. Then had come the fashion of collecting the Sonnets and kindred verse into POETI CAL MISCELLANIES. So much poetry occasioned DISCUSSIONS AND CONTROVERSIES IN THE ART OF POETRY, begun by Gascoigne and which were destined to continue, with hardly a break, beyond the time of Dryden. Soon after came up the EuphuiSTIC OR

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