Shirley, by Currer Bell, Volume 2

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Page 296 - This is an autumn evening, wet and wild. There is only one cloud in the sky, but it curtains it from pole to pole. The wind cannot rest ; it hurries sobbing over hills of sullen outline, colourless with twilight and mist. Rain has beat all day on that church tower...
Page 216 - Thank you, and good-bye to you, friends,' said Shirley, as she closed the gates on a quiet court. Now, let me hear the most refined of Cockneys presume to find fault with Yorkshire manners! Taken as they ought to be, the majority of the lads and lasses of the West-Riding are gentlemen and ladies, every inch of them: it is only against the weak affectation and futile pomposity of a would-be aristocrat they turn mutinous.
Page 194 - I would not trouble - I would help him/ was the reply. 'How? By inspiring him with heroism? Pooh! These are not the days of chivalry: it is not a tilt at a tournament we are going to behold, but a struggle about money, and food, and life.
Page 266 - ... indolent, a reckless, an ignorant being, she would take a pen at such moments; or at least while the recollection of such moments was yet fresh on her spirit: she would seize, she would fix the apparition, tell the vision revealed. Had she a little more of the organ of acquisitiveness in her head — a little more of the love of property in her nature, she would take a good-sized sheet of paper and write plainly out, in her own queer but clear and legible hand, the story that has been narrated,...
Page 249 - Miss Hardman, my love, was a very strong-minded young lady, of most distinguished talents: the aristocracy are decidedly a very superior class, you know - both physically, and morally, and mentally - as a high Tory I acknowledge that;- I could not describe the dignity of her voice and mien as she addressed me thus: still, I fear, she was selfish, my dear. I would never wish to speak ill of my superiors in rank; but I think she was a little selfish.' 'I remember,' continued Mrs. Pryor, after a pause,...
Page 196 - cried Shirley. " How steadily they march in ! There is discipline in their ranks — I will not say there is courage : hundreds against tens are no proof of that quality ; but " (she dropped her voice) "there is suffering and desperation enough amongst them — these goads will urge them forwards.
Page 120 - For you are aware,' he would continue, 'that I now work Hollow's Mill entirely on speculation: I sell nothing; there is no market for my goods. I manufacture for a future day: I make myself ready to take advantage of the first opening that shall occur. Three months ago this was impossible to me; I had exhausted both credit and capital: you well know who came to my rescue; from what hand I received the loan which saved me. It is on the strength of that loan I am enabled to continue the bold game which,...
Page 196 - Hatchets and crowbars against the yard-gates: they are forcing them. Are you afraid?" "No; but my heart throbs fast; I have a difficulty in standing: I will sit down. Do you feel unmoved?" "Hardly that — but I am glad I came: we shall see what transpires with our own eyes: we are here on the spot, and none know it. Instead of amazing the curate, the clothier, and the corndealer with a romantic rush on the stage, we stand alone with the friendly night, its mute stars, and these whispering trees,...
Page 272 - Solomon's virtuous woman, are often quoted as patterns of what ' the sex ' (as they say) ought to be. I don't know : Lucretia, I daresay, was a most worthy sort of person, much like my cousin Hortense Moore ; but she kept her servants up very late. I should not have liked to be amongst the number of the maidens. Hortense would just work me and Sarah in that fashion, if she could, and neither of us would bear it. The ' virtuous woman,' again, had her household up in the very middle of the night ;...
Page 209 - If men could see us as we really are, they would be a little amazed; but the cleverest, the acutest men are often under an illusion about women: they do not read them in a true light; they misapprehend them, both for good and evil: their good woman is a queer thing, half doll, half angel; their bad woman almost always a fiend.

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