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one or two instances, he has borrowed a line from any other author ; though, doubtless, in writing about ten thousand lines his memory may have unconsciously furnished him with a few lines, borrowed from others. Never, in a Psalm or Hymn, has he been willing to sacrifice sense to sound ; nor does he conceive, that the necessity of rhyme bas impaired the senti

The reasons of a multitude of changes cannot be given in detail; they may be comprised in a regard to rhyme, poetry, musical accent, sense, and devotion. In Watts, Book II, H, 55; st. 5, the phrase “Good God;" and in Church Psalmody, p. 509 and 520, ihe phrase " Great God,” have been altered, because, as no address to God follower, and they seemed to be mere rhetorical exclamations, it was not easy to discriminate between them and profane expressions.

In the 2d stanza of Heber's missionary Hymn, the sense is imperfect, and ou this account, perhaps, Monigomery, in his Church Psalmist, has oinitted ihe whole stanza. The author has ventured to correct the stanza; and, in all pieces, has made the changes, which seemed to be required.

This book has a greater variety of metres, than any other book of Psalms and Hymns: and an atiempt has been made to adapt the metres to the subject. In the seven syllable trochaic measure there are 183 pieces; in the 6 and 4 measure it has 31, The ChurchPsalınody has, of the first, 108 pieces and, of the last, 5; and has in metres, other than the Long, Common, and Short, 230 or 240 pieces. This book has 368.

la the selected Hymns it will be seen, that many changes have been made, either to give rhymes to unrhymed lines, or to correct bad ones, or to produce a greater uniformity of accent, for the sake of the music, when it could be done without impairing an excellence more important,

To ali his pieces the author has endeavored to give a lyrical character: he lias endeavored to make them, in sentiment and form, suitable to be sing, and suitable for public worship. The emotions, expressed in an ode or lyrical piece, may be strong, however, without the utterance of “ alas,' « hark," and "oh,' and without any address to God. There is no address to God in 65 of the 212 Episc Hymus. In fact as many as 40 of the Psalms of David contain no direct address to God: while yet they are lyrical, and indicative of pious emotions, some of them being inscribed to the chief musician. The soul in its deep affections dwells on the truths, or facts, which relate to God; and the consideration of these truths may occupy the greater part of an ode, while the out-burst of praise to God may be found only in the closing lines:-—or these truths may occupy the whole of the piece without destroying its lyrical character. There may be deep emotion, which is not noisy.' We must look to the sentiment, to the diction, to the imagery, to the structure of the piece, in order to determine its lyrical character.

Some writers bave maintained, that the 119th Psalm, being di

XXX

ment.

one or two instances, he has borrowed a line from any other
author ; though, doubtless, in writing about ten thousand lines
bis memory may have unconsciously furnished him with a few
lines, borrowed from others. Never, in a Psalm or Hymn,
has he been willing sacrifice sense to sound ; nor does he
conceive, that the necessity of rhyme has impaired the senti-

The reasons of a multitude of changes cannot be given in detail;
they inay be comprised in a regard to rhyme, poetry, musical ac-
cent, sense, and devotion. In Watts, Book II, H, 55; st. 5, the
phrase " Good God;" and in Church Psalmody, p. 509 and 520,
the phrase " Great God,” have been altered, because, as no ad-
dress to God followed, and they seemed to be mere rhetorical er.
clamations, it was not easy to discriminate between them and pro-
fane expressions.

In the 2d stap Za of Heber's missionary Hymn, the sense is imperfect, and ou this account, perhaps, Montgomery, in his Church Psalmist, has onnitted the whole stanza. The author has ventured to correct the stanza: and, in all pieces, has made the changes, which seemed to be required.

This book has a greater variety of metres, than any other book of Psalms and Hymns: and an aliempt has been made to adapt the metres to the subject. In the seven syllable trochaic measure there are 183 pieces, in the 6 ani 4 measure it has 31, The ChurchPsalmody has, of the first, 108 pieces and, of the last, 7; and has ia metres, other than the Long, Common, and Short, 230 or 240 pieces. This book has 368.

In the selected Hymns it will be seen, that many changes bare been made, either to give rhymes to unrhymed lines, or to correct bad ones, or to produce a greater uniformity of accent, for the sake of the music, when it could be done without impairing an excellence more important.

To all his pieces the author has endeavored to give a lyrical character: he has endeavored to make them, in sentiment and form, suitable to be sung, and suitable for public worship. The einotions, expressed in an ode or lyrical piece, may be strong, however, without the utterance of" alas," hark," and "oh," and without any address to God. There is no address to God in 65 of the 212 Episcopal Hymns. In fact as many as 40 of the Psalms of David contain no direct address to God: while yet they are lyrical, and indicative of pious emotions, some of them being inscribed to the chief musician. The soul in its deep affections dwells on the truths, or facts, which relate to God; and the consideration of these traths

dactic, was not lyrical: yet if poetical structure, beautiful senti-
ment, fervent feeling, and constant address to God constitute an
ode, that Psalm is an admirable lyrical composition. The author
has given an entire version of it in the trochaic ineasure, as best a-
dapted to express its character.
În versifying the Psalms generally he has endeavored to avoid the
two extremnes of being too literal and too paraphrastic in bis ver-
sioo; bat the latter error be deems more inexcusable, than the for-
mer. God, in his infinite wisdom, knows what truths to communi-
cate, and in what manner; with what illustrations and accompani-
ments. If, then, the author should take a Psalm, and in what he
calls a version should bring together solema and interesting truths,
derived, not from that Psalm, but from other sources; how could
this be called a version of that Psalm? As, however, parts of some
of the Psalms are historical and contain narratives of events, not
adapted for Christian psalmody, or are otherwise not adapted to
the purposes of lyrical composition; in these cases only the spirit
of the Psalm can be given, or some one event may be selected and
modified to Christian use. But where the Psalm is suitable for
prezent use, the version should adhere closely to the original. By
these views the author has been governed. He has endeavored to
give rather copies than imitations of the Psalms.
Besides his own Hymns, he has made an ample selection of
Hynns from the most interesting and valuable collections in the
English language, and has endeavored to arrange them in a clear,
Well studied method,

which is indicated at the top of each page: lo respect to the adaptation of the music to the pieces of this book a Notice is annexed of Mr. Noyes, a Teacher of music. This book contains 1243 lyrical pieces; of these 660 are

Pealms and 583 are of which have been written

with a double regard to the laws of poetical and of musical composition ; but with what harmony of these and with what melody and inspiration of sung it is for the public it may be said, through the blessing of God upon his harping, as archbishop Parker said of David,

"With golden stringes such harmonie
His barpe so sweete did wrest,
That he relierd his phrenesie,
Whom wicked sprites possest.”

[graphic]

4

BRUNSWICK, Maine, June 3, 1835.

may occupy the greater part of an ode, while the out-burst of praise to God may be found only in the closing lines:-or these tracks may occupy the whole of the piece without destroying its lyrical character. There may be deep emotion, which is not noisy. We must look to the sentiment, to the diction, to the imagery, to the structure of the piece, in order to determine its lyrical character.

Somne writers have maintained, that the 119th Psalm, being die

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or cres.

or dim.

EXPLANATION OF THE MARKS OF MUSICAL

EXPRESSION.
ITALIAN
mezzo, middle, neither loud nor soft. In

this way are to be sung the passa

ges, which have no mark.
P piano,

soft.
mezzo piano, midelle sost, or a little soft.
pp pianissimo,
f forte,

Joud.
mfmezzo forte, middle loud, or a little loud.
fr forlissimo,
dol dolce,

in a gentle, smooth, gliding manner.
Af affetluoso, with deep and tender feeling.
Jen lentando, gradually becoming slower and

softer to the end,
crescendo, increasing louder and louder.
diminuendo, diminishing, softer and softer.

increasing, then diminishing.

diminishing, then increasing.
staccato, short, distinct, articulate.

at the beginning of a line contra-
dicts or counteracts the preceding
mark. In the middle, or at the
close, it denotes a pause, which
may be louger or shorter, as the

occasion may require.

NOTICE TO SINGERS,
The subscriber, in superintending the adapting of the music to
this book of Psalms and Hymns, bas bad occasion to examine eve-
ry stanza with reference to its being fitted to be sung, The tunes
named need not always be used ;-They are designed to express the
general character of ihe tunes, which would be adapted to the piece.
In respect to the Psalms, of the two lunes, which are mentioned,
the first is taken from the “Choir," of Mr. Lowell Mason, and the
second from the “ Boston Academy's Collection,” prepared by the
same author. In the Hymns the first of the two tuves is taken
from the “Boston Academy's Collection,” and the second from the
“Ancient Lyre" by Mr. Charles Zeuner :-which works, and espe-
cially the two last, are recommended to singers, where this book
may be introduced. Yet many of the tunes, referred to, are found
also in the Handel and Ilayan Collection and in Mr. Gould's Na-
tional Church Harmony.

CHARLES J. NOYES.
BRUNSWICK, June, 1935.

19

EXPLANATION OF THE MARKS OF MUSICAL

A TABLE of the HYMNS OF WATTS, as referred to
Hymns in this book.

BOOK I.

EXPRESSION

ITALIAN mezzo,

m

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466 486 284 353

f forle,

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middle, neither loud nor soft. In
this way are to be sung the passa-

ges, which have no mark.
p piano, , soft.
mp mezzo piano, middle soft, or a little soft.
pp pianissimo,

Joud. mfmezzo forte, middle loud, or a little loud. ff fortissimo, very loud. dol dolce, in a gentle, smooth, gliding manner. Af affelluoso, with deep and tender feeling. len lentando, gradually becoming slower and

softer to the end. crescendo,

increasing louder and louder. diminuendo, diminishing, softer and softer.

mereasing, then diminishing,

diminishing, then increasing.
staccato,

short, distinct, articulate.
at the beginning of a line contra-
dicts or counteracts the preceding
mark. In the middle, or at the
close, it denotes a pause, which
may be longer or shorter, as the
occasion may require.

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A. 403 404

15 467 288 454 212 213

82 232 304 199 139 143 310 265 295 293 512 160 311 490 290 133

88
89
91
92
93
94
95
97
98
100
101
102
103
105
103
109
110
111
112

W.
113
115
116
117
118
119
120
122
125
127
123
129
132
134
135
136
137
139
140
1.12
143

A. 303 261 335

27 231 140 315 329 128 132 372 302 336 333 119 332 118 328 316 114 297 208 123 124 116

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or cres.

51 57 58 61

or dim.

106

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NOTICE TO SINGERS.
The subscriber, in superintending the adapting of the music to
thuis book of Psalms and Hymns, las bad occasion to examine ere-
ry stanza with reference to its being fitted 10 be sung, The tunes
named need not always be used ;-chey are designed to express the
general character of the tunes, which would be adapted to the piece.
In respect to the Psalms, of the two tunes, which are mentioned,
the first is taken from the "Choir," of Mr. Lowell Mason, anul the
second from the Boston Academy's Collection,prepared by the
samne author. In the Hymns the first of the two tunes is taken
from the "Bostou Academy's Collection," and the second froin the
"Ancient Lyre” by Mr. Charles Zeuger:—which works, and espe-
cially the iwo last, are recommended to singers, where this book
may be introduced. Yet many of the tunes, referred to, are found
also in the Handel and Hayun Collection and in Mr. Gould's Na-
tional Church Harmony.

CHARLES J. NOYES.
BRUNSWICK, Junc, 1935.

14 15 18 19 23 25 28 30 31 32 34

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A,
359
331
457
43
91
455
477

40
453
456
157
479
481
357
488
491

41 47 48 52 54 55 58 59 60 63 64 65 66

W.
67
72
74
76
77
79
86
88
89
90
91
93
94
95
103
104

A.

9 74 274 100 320

88 522 149 104 110 183 42 41 113 89 90

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190

E

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47

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105
106
107
108
110
112
113
114
118
120
122
125
129

130
131
133
136
137
138
139
140
142
114
146
118
150

200

.

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BOOK III,

W.

W.

278
280
337
109
485
352
351

96
134

45
3-16
309
313

43
198
139
95
52
136
138
125
373
461
122
261

151
152
153
158
159
160
161
164
165
166
169
169
170

211
213
210
214
296
462
330
14
10
16
17

A.
516
553
5.18

A.
550
551
559

W.
19
22
23

A.
557
551
555

2
3

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