Clifford W. Beers: Advocate for the Insane

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University of Pittsburgh Pre, Jul 15, 1980 - Biography & Autobiography - 424 pages
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Norman Dain offers a compelling biography of Clifford W. Beers, whose lifelong battle against his own mental illness inspired him to become a champion for mental health. Beers' autobiography, A Mind That Found Itself, created a public outcry in 1908, as it chronicled Beers' experiences during his three-year confinement in an asylum. Despite his disability, Beers went on to found the National Committee for Mental Hygiene (now the National Association for Mental Health), the American Foundation for Mental Hygiene, and the International Committee for Mental Hygiene.
 

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Contents

Crisis and Collapse
3
2 Stamford Hall
19
3 The Hartford Retreat
25
4 Connecticut Hospital for the Insane
36
5 Back in Circulation
53
6 Writing the Autobiography
61
7 Publication of A Mind That Found Itself
87
8 A Reform Movement Launched
100
13 Canning Salmon and Bottling Beers
193
14 Branching Out
219
15 The First International Congress on Mental Hygiene
244
16 Traveling and Family Troubles
254
Fame and Honors
269
18 Personal Interests
277
19 The Mentally Ill Intrude
289
Crisis and Collapse
305

9 The Connecticut Society and Founding the National Committee
116
10 The Ox and the Wild Ass
134
11 Phipps To the Rescue
154
The Salmon Years First Phase
165
Epilogue
323
Notes
335
Index
385
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Norman Dain is professor emeritus of history at Rutgers University and the author of several books including: Concepts of Insanity in the United States 1789-1865; and Disordered Minds: The First Century of Eastern State Hospital in Williamsburg, Virginia, 1766-1866.

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