An Inquiry Into the Seat and Nature of Fever: As Deducible from the Phenomena, Causes, and Consequences of the Disease, the Effects of Remedies, and the Appearances on Dissection. In Two Parts. Part the First, Containing the General Doctrine of Fever

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Knight & Compton, 1807 - Electronic books - 440 pages

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Page 66 - The remote causes are certain sedative powers applied to the nervous system, which, diminishing the energy of the brain, thereby produce a debility in the whole of the functions, and particularly in the action of the extreme vessels.
Page 77 - ... delirium and coma may be produced by various caufes, by opium and narcotics. But a miftake of a more dangerous nature may be committed, as we learn from the following important remark. ' There is a fpecies of delirium that often attends the early acceffion of typhus fever from contagion, that I have known to be miftaken for ebriety. Among feamen and foldiers, where habits of intoxication are common, it will fometimes require nice difcernment to decide ; for the vacant ftare in the countenance,...
Page 33 - Sometimes a fevere fixed pain is felt in one or both temples, or over one or both eyebrows, frequently in the bottom of the orbits of the eyes. The eyes always appear very full, heavy, yellowifh, and very often a little inflamed.
Page 31 - According to him, the patient at first grows somewhat listless, and feels slight chills and shudders, with uncertain flushes of heat, and a kind of weariness all over, like what is felt after great fatigue. This is always attended with a sort of heaviness and dejection of spirit, and more or less of a load, pain, or giddiness of the head ; a nausea...
Page 108 - ... kind of air, attracted by alkaline substances, is deadly to all animals that breathe it by the mouth and nostrils together; but that if the nostrils were kept shut, I was led to think that it might be breathed with safety. I found, for example, that when sparrows died in it in ten or eleven seconds, they would live in it for three or four minutes when the nostrils were shut by melted suet. And I convinced myself, that the change produced on wholesome air by breathing it, consisted chiefly, if...
Page 250 - Port-au-Prince, confifted of twenty-eight men. With them, no preventive plan was followed : in a. very few weeks eight died, and, at prefent, of the original number but fourteen remain.
Page 32 - A great torpor, or obtufe .pain and coldnefs, affcns the hinder-part of the head frequently, and oftentimes a heavy pain is felt on the top all along the coronary future ; this, and that of the back-part of the head, generally attend nervous fevers, and are commonly fucceeded by fome degree •of a delirium...
Page 36 - At this time the winds blew moftly from the fouth, and, after fun-fet, there fell an unufual and very heavy dew. This difeafe began commonly with alternate flight chills and heats, naufea, pains of the head, of the back, of the loins, and at the pit of the ftomach.
Page 108 - I had discovered that this particular kind of air, attracted by alkaline substances, is deadly to all animals that breathe it by the mouth and nostrils together; but that if the nostrils were kept shut, I was led to think that it might be breathed with safety. I found, for example, that when sparrows died in it in ten or eleven seconds, they would live in it for three or four minutes when the nostrils were shut by melted suet. And I convinced...

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