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1 Such is the popular and ordinary mode of explanation. In reality, however,
the long o in Samo consists of two short vowels combined, and one of these is
actually elided before the vowel in hic, while the remaining short one, being in
the arsis of the foot, is lengthened by the stress of the voice that falls upon it.

2 The second syllable in connubium is naturally short, but it is occasionally
lengthened by the poets in the arsis of the foot.
3 Consult note on i. 405.

4 In Ionic 'Ixcovña, in Attic 'Incovéa.
5 The true principle has been explained in the note on line 16.

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1 In such words as these the letter i is considered to have had the force of a
consonant, and very probably was sounded like the English y in young, yes, &c.
The first syllable, then, in abiete is regarded as long by position.
2 Consult note on line 1€.

3 Ibid.
4 Consult Anthon's Latin Prosody, p. 126.
• 5 The true principle is stated in the note on i. 16.

6 The pause after riemus, as required by the sense, must also be taken into
account.

7 Consult note on i. 611.

8 In truth, however, one of the short component vowels of the diphthong e is
cut off before the vowel in the next word, and the other one, not being in the
arsis of the foot, remains short.

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1 The diphthong yi answers to the Greek vi. Thus, Harpyia, "Apavia.
2 Consult note on line 212.
3 There is no occasion for our here having recourse to a Doric nominative in as.

4 The final vowel of semi is here elided. Some, however, prefer to make the i of
semi coalesce with the one that follows: thus, sem-yus-tum, &c. .

5 The true principle is stated in the note to i. 16.
6 Consult note on i. 16, where the explanation is given.
7 In Greek Oviás. Compare note on iii. 212.
8 The true principle is stated in the note on i. 16.

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i Consult note on iii. 578.

2 Observe that the final vowel in Ilio is short here, because, after one of the
two short vowels in the long o is cut off, the remaining one is in the thesis, not
the arsis of the foot, and, therefore, as it has no stress of the voice laid upon it, it
remains short.

3 The poets occasionally take advantage of the double power of u, and make it
a consonant in words where such a change is necessary or convenient. Here, there-
fore, the u is regarded as a consonant, and the e in genua is long by position.

4 Consult note on iii. 578.
5 The true principle is stated in the note on i. 16.

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i Consult note on ii. 16.

2 Consult note on iii. 212.
3 Observe that te loses one of its short vowels, and that the other remains short,
because in the thesis. Consult note on v. 261, and on i. 16.

4 Consult note on ii. 16.

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