The Military Mentor: Being a Series of Letters Recently Written by a General Officer to His Son on His Entering the Army, Comprising a Course of Elegent Instruction Calculated to Unite the Characters and Accomplishments of the Gentleman and Soldier, Volume 1

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Page 71 - This gentleman being sent out by Henry, before the battle, to reconnoitre the enemy, and to find out their strength, made this report : — " May it please you, my liege, there are enough to be killed, enough to be taken prisoners, and enough to run away.
Page 47 - There are some, perhaps, who would imagine that every Englishman fights better than the subjects of absolute governments, because he has more to defend. But what has the English more than the French soldier? Property they are both commonly without. Liberty is, to the lowest rank of every nation, little more than the choice of working or starving ; and this choice is, I suppose, equally allowed in every country.
Page 289 - I conceive, because he could not handsomely without danger of discovery, had not paired the sword I sent him to Paris ; bringing one of the same length, but twice as broad ; my second excepted against it, and advised me to match my own, and send him the choice, which I obeyed ; it being you know, the challenger's privilege to elect his weapon. At the delivery of the sword, which was performed by sir John...
Page 27 - The life of a modern soldier is ill represented by heroic fiction. War has means of destruction more formidable than the cannon and the sword. Of the thousands and ten thousands that perished in our late contests with France and Spain, a very small part ever felt the stroke of an enemy ; the rest languished in tents and ships, amidst damps and putrefaction ; pale, torpid, spiritless and helpless ; gasping and groaning, unpitied among men, made obdurate by long continuance of hopeless misery ; and...
Page 272 - ... society, an affront is held to be a serious injury. It must, therefore, be resented, or rather a duel must be fought upon it ; as men have agreed to banish from their society one who puts up with an affront without fighting a duel. Now, sir, it is never unlawful to fight in self-defence.
Page 77 - Lord Chesterfield's character of this noblemen is too remarkable to be omitted. " Of all the men that ever I knew in my life, (and I knew him extremely well,) the late Duke of Marlborough possessed the graces in the highest degree, not to say engrossed them...
Page 273 - He, then, who fights a duel, does not fight from passion against his antagonist, but out of self-defence ; to avert the stigma of the world, and to prevent himself from being driven out of society. I could wish there was not that superfluity of refinement; but while such notions prevail, no. doubt a man may lawfully fight a duel.
Page 292 - I am slain!' seconding his speech with all the force he had to cast me. But being too weak, after I had defended his assault, I easily became master of him, laying him on his back; when being upon him, I redemanded if he would request his life, but it seemed he prized it not at so dear a rate to be beholden for it; bravely replying
Page 44 - French to leadj but it is, I think, universally allowed, that the English soldiers are more willing to follow. Our nation...
Page 296 - Any officer or soldier who shall upbraid another for refusing a challenge, shall himself be punished as a challenger; and all officers and soldiers are hereby discharged from any disgrace or opinion of disadvantage which might arise from their having refused to accept of challenges, as they will only have acted in obedience to the laws, and done their duty as good soldiers who subject themselves to discipline.

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