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Books Books 1 - 10 of 80 on He that has not a mastery over his inclinations, he that knows not how to resist....
" He that has not a mastery over his inclinations, he that knows not how to resist the importunity of present pleasure or pain, for the sake of what reason tells him is fit to be done, wants the true principle of virtue and industry, and is in danger never... "
Some Thoughts Concerning Education - Page 111
by John Locke - 1880 - 364 pages
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Some thoughts concerning education [by J. Locke.]. By J. Locke

John Locke - 1712
...that knows not how to re/iji the Importunity of prefixt Pleafttre or Pain, for the Sake of what Reafon tells him is fit to be done, wants the true Principle of Vertue and Induftry, and is in Danger never to be good for any Thing. This Temper therefore, fo contrary...
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Memoirs of the life of Martha Laurens Ramsay: With an appendix, containing ...

Martha Laurens Ramsay, David Ramsay, Henry Laurens - 1815 - 259 pages
...the supreme dominion of reason and religion ; to practise self-denial; to bear disappointments; and to resist the importunity of present pleasure or pain, for the sake of what reason pronounces fit to be done or borne. She suckled all her children without the aid of any wet nurse;...
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Laconics: Or Instructive Miscellanies, Selected from the Best Authors ...

A general reader - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1827 - 188 pages
...fruitless efforts, and multiply the griefs which he purposes 10 ic...~,-. r/,;^_ He that has not a mastery over his inclinations ; he that knows not...and is in danger of never being good for any thing. — -Locke. Vice stings us even in our pleasures, but Virtue consoles us even in our pains. — Cowper....
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Memoirs of Eminently Pious Women of Britain and America

David Francis Bacon - Christian biography - 1833 - 608 pages
...the supreme dominion of reason and religion ; to practise self denial ; to bear disappointments ; and to resist the importunity of present pleasure or pain, for the sake of what reason pronounces fit to be done or borne. She suckled all her children without the aid of any wet nurse ;...
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The Quarterly Journal of Education, Volume 10

Education - 1835
...very nature of his existence), his first achievement must be to govern himself. ' He that has not a mastery over his inclinations, he that knows not how...principle of virtue and industry, and is in danger never to be good for anything. This temper, therefore, so contrary to unguided nature, is to be got...
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The Schoolmaster: Essays on Practical Education, Selected from the ..., Volume 2

Education - 1836
...very nature of his existence), his first achievement must be to govern himself. " He that has not a mastery over his inclinations, he that knows not how...the true principle of virtue and industry, and is in dangcr never to be good for anything. This temper, therefore, so contrary to unguided nature, is to...
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The schoolmaster: essays on practical education, selected from the works of ...

Schoolmaster - 1836
...very nature of his existence), his first achievement must be to govern himself. " He that has not a mastery over his inclinations, he that knows not how...the sake of what reason tells him is fit to be done, wauts the true principle of virtue and industry, and is in danger never to be good for anything. This...
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The Girl's Reading-book: In Prose and Poetry, for Schools

Lydia Howard Sigourney - Conduct of life - 1843 - 243 pages
...desires to the control of reason and religion ; to practise self-denial ; to bear disappointment ; to resist the importunity of present pleasure or pain, for the sake of what wisdom and experience pronounced necessary to be done, or to be suffered. , Their duty to God, she...
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The World's Laconics: Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors

Tryon Edwards - Quotations, English - 1853 - 432 pages
...scorn ; the power of calm reliance in scenes of darkness and storms. SELF-RULE. — He that has not a mastery over his inclinations ; he that knows not...industry, and is in danger of never being good for anything. — Locke. SELF-RULE. — A man must first govern himself, ere he be fit to govern a family...
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Examples from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

Lydia Howard Sigourney - Biography - 1857 - 349 pages
...their passions to the control of reason and religion, to practise self-denial, to bear disappointment, to resist the importunity of present pleasure or pain, for the sake of what wisdom and experience pronounced necessary to be done, or to be suffered. She early imparted to their...
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