Some Thoughts Concerning Education

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National Society's Depository, 1880 - Education - 364 pages
 

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Page 60 - I think I may say, that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education.
Page 59 - A sound mind in a. sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world ; he that has these two has little more to wish for ; and he that wants either of them will be but little the better for anything else.
Page 60 - Not only does it include whatever we do for ourselves, and whatever is done for us by others, for the express purpose of bringing us somewhat nearer to the perfection of our nature; it does more: in its largest acceptation, it comprehends even the indirect effects produced on character and on the human faculties, by things of which the direct purposes are quite different; by laws, byforms of government, by the industrial arts, by modes of social life; nay even by physical facts not dependent on human...
Page 19 - The great work of a governor is to fashion the carriage and form the mind, to settle in his pupil good habits and the principles of virtue and wisdom, to give him by little and little a view of mankind, and work him into a love and imitation of what is excellent and praiseworthy, and in the prosecution of it to give him vigor, activity, and industry.
Page 42 - Art; and he that has found a way, how to keep up a Child's Spirit, easy, active and free; and yet, at the same time, to restrain him from many things he has a Mind to, and to draw him to things that are uneasy to him; he, I say, that knows how to reconcile these seeming Contradictions, has, in my Opinion, got the true Secret of Education.
Page 347 - My stature certainly is not tall; but it rather approaches the middle than the diminutive. Yet what if it were diminutive, when so many men, illustrious both in peace and war, have been the same ? And how can that be called diminutive, which is great enough for every virtuous achievement? Nor, though very thin, was I ever deficient in courage...
Page 4 - Few books have contributed more than Mr. Locke's Essay to rectify prejudice ; to undermine established errors; to diffuse a just mode of thinking; to excite a fearless spirit of inquiry, and yet to contain it within the boundaries which Nature has prescribed to the human understanding.
Page 111 - He that has not a mastery over his inclinations, he that knows not how to resist the importunity of present pleasure or pain, for the sake of what reason tells him is fit to be done, wants the true principle of virtue and industry, and is in danger never to be good for any thing.
Page 139 - But till you can find a School wherein it is possible for the Master to look after the Manners of his Scholars, and can shew as great Effects of his Care of forming their Minds to Virtue, and their Carriage to good Breeding, as of forming their Tongues to the learned Languages, you must confess, that you have a strange Value for Words, when preferring the Languages of the ancient Greeks and Romans to that which made 'em such brave Men, you think it worth while to hazard your Son's Innocence and Virtue...
Page 26 - ... to improve young men in their own language, that they may thoroughly understand and be masters of it. If any one among us have a facility or purity more than ordinary in his mother tongue, it is owing to chance, or his genius, or any thing, rather than to his education, or any care of his teacher.

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