The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 248

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Bradbury, Evans, 1880 - English periodicals

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Page 604 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings: Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 736 - And I have loved thee, Ocean ! and my joy Of youthful sports was on thy breast to be Borne, like thy bubbles, onward : from a boy I wantoned with thy breakers — they to me Were a delight : and if the freshening sea Made them a terror — 'twas a pleasing fear, For I was as it were a child of thee, And trusted to thy billows far and near, And laid my hand upon thy mane — as I do here.
Page 415 - LET it be granted that a straight line may be drawn from any one point to any other point.
Page 604 - THE glories of our birth and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings. Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade. Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill ; But their strong nerves at last must yield ; They tame but one another still. Early or late, They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives,...
Page 734 - But whatever judgment may be passed on the poems of this noble minor, it seems we must take them as we find them, and be content; for they are the last we shall ever have from him. He is, at best, he says, but an intruder into the groves of Parnassus ; he never lived in a garret, like thorough-bred poets; and "though he once roved a careless mountaineer in the Highlands of Scotland," he has not of late enjoyed this advantage.
Page 653 - Whosoever shall, either during the Life of the Testator or after his Death, steal, or for any fraudulent Purpose destroy, cancel, obliterate, or conceal, the whole or any Part of any Will, Codicil, or other Testamentary Instrument, whether the same shall relate to Real or Personal Estate, or to both, shall be guilty of Felony...
Page 314 - What can be more curious than that the hand of a man, formed for grasping, that of a mole for digging, the leg of the horse, the paddle of the porpoise, and the wing of the bat, should all be constructed on the same pattern, and should include similar bones, in the same relative positions?
Page 303 - In my possession are two little embryos in spirit, whose names I have omitted to attach, and at present I am quite unable to say to what class they belong. They may be lizards or small birds, or very young mammalia, BO complete is the similarity in the mode of formation of the head and trunk in these animals.
Page 726 - But his fame is gone out like a candle in a snuff, and his memory will always stink, which might have ever lived in honourable repute, had not he been a notorious traitor and most impiously and villanously bely'd that blessed martyr king, Charles the First.
Page 742 - Do you not come your tardy son to chide, That, lapsed in time and passion, lets go by . The important acting of your dread command?

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