Memoirs of William Sampson: including particulars of his adventures in various parts of Europe; his confinement in the dungeons of the inquisition in Lisbon, &c., &c. Several original letters; being his correspondence with the ministers of state in Great-Britain and Portugal; a short sketch of the history of Ireland, particularly as it respects the spirit of British domination in that country; and a few observations on the state of manners &c., in America

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Printed for the author by G. Forman, 1807 - History - 448 pages
 

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Page 321 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page ii - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Page 297 - if the English would neither in peace govern them by the law, nor in warre roote them out by the sword, must they not needs be pricks in their eyes, and thorns in their sides to the worlde's end?
Page 386 - ... certainly exceeds, in the comparative number of those it consigns to ruin and misery, every example that ancient or modern history can afford.
Page 390 - A bill for preventing revenue officers from voting or interfering at elections ? A bill for rendering the servants of the crown of Ireland responsible for the expenditure of the public money? A bill to protect the personal safety of the subject against arbitrary and excessive bail, and against the stretching of the power of attachment beyond the limits of the constitution ? And will you, as far as in you lies, prevent any renewal of the Police act?
Page 280 - ... west parts of the world ; the long inlets of many navigable rivers, and so many great lakes and fresh ponds within the...
Page 389 - A bill for preventing pensioners from sitting in parliament, or such placemen as cannot sit in the British House of Commons. " A bill for limiting the number of placemen and pensioners and the amount of pension. " A bill for preventing revenue officers from voting at elections. " A bill for rendering the servants of the crown of Ireland responsible for the expenditure of the public money. " A bill to protect the personal safety of the subject against arbitrary and excessive bail, and against the...
Page 420 - In the awful presence of God I, AB do voluutarily declare, that I will persevere in endeavouring to form a brotherhood of affection among Irishmen, of every religious persuasion ; and that I will also persevere in my endeavours to obtain an equal, full, and adequate representation of all the people of Ireland.
Page 300 - Every inconsiderable party, who, under the pretence of loyalty, received the king's commission to repel the adversary in some particular district, became pestilent enemies to the inhabitants. Their properties, their lives, the chastity of their families, were all exposed to barbarians, who sought only to glut their brutal passions; and by their horrible excesses purchased the curse of God and man.
Page 428 - Your patriotic exertions in the cause of your country have hitherto exceeded your most sanguine expectations, and in a short time must ultimately be crowned with success. Liberty has raised her drooping head : thousands daily flock to her standard : the voice of her children every where prevails. Let us then, in the. moment of triumph, return thanks to the Almighty Ruler of the Universe, that a total stop has been put to those sanguinary...

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