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BUREAU OF EDUCATION

BULLETIN, 1917, No. 23

THREE SHORT COURSES IN

HOME MAKING

By CARRIE ALBERTA LYFORD
SPECIALIST IN HOME ECONOMICS, BUREAU OF EDUCATION

[graphic][subsumed][merged small]

Barvard College Library

Oot. 2, 1917.

From
United States Govornmont

MICROFILMED
AT HARVARD

ADDITIONAL COPIES

OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D. C.

AT

15 CENTS PER COPY

CONTENTS.

THREE SHORT COURSES IN HOME MAKING.

INTRODUCTION.

The three brief courses in home making outlined in this pamphlet have been especially prepared for use in the elementary rural schools. They are in no sense a complete outline of the subjects with which they deal; rather, they indicate a few of the important phases of food study, sewing, and care of the home with which the girl in the elementary school should become familiar. The underlying thought for each problem should be, “Will this help the girls to live more useful lives and will it lead to better conditions in their homes?

The lessons are purposely made simple, and the plans are definitely outlined, so that the inexperienced teacher will be able to get her problem well in hand. The experienced teacher may find in them suggestions that will be of value in the further development of her

course.

The lessons were originally planned for use in the rural schools of the South. During the six months that they have been in use, however, the demand for copies of the outlines has been almost equally great from all parts of the country; hence, in so far as possible, general problems have been stated. In any case the teacher who desires to use the course will necessarily have to adapt it to her own community, and it is hoped that she may be able to do this with but little alteration. While conditions of living and choice of foods differ in the various parts of the country, general principles of nutrition, rules of sanitation, and methods of cooking and serving are the same for all.

Because of the short school year in some rural schools and the difficulty of securing time on the program for frequent lessons in home making, each of the courses has been limited to 20 lessons. Some teachers may not be able to have a greater number of lessons during the school year, and they will find it well to carry the three courses through three successive years. In other schools where more frequent lessons can be given it may be well to offer all three of the courses during one year. The courses in cooking and the care of the home can be combined to advantage, as many of their problems are 1 The original outlines were prepared in response to requests received from southern State supervisors.

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