The Speeches of the Right Honourable William Pitt, in the House of Commons, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1817 - Great Britain
 

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Page 316 - That an humble address be presented to His Majesty, to return His Majesty the thanks of this House for his most gracious message to this House, signified by His Grace the Lord-lieutenant.
Page 132 - It was indeed the most absurd bigotry in asserting the general principle, to exclude the exception; but trade, industry, and barter would always find their own level, and be impeded by regulations which violated their natural operation, and deranged their proper effect.
Page 49 - ... conjuncture, for maintaining the security and rights of his own dominions ; for supporting his allies; and for opposing views of aggrandizement and ambition on the part of France, which would be at all times dangerous to the general interests of Europe, but are peculiarly so, when connected with the propagation of principles, which lead to the violation of the most sacred duties and are utterly subversive of the peace and order of all civil society.
Page 163 - Majesty ("conformably to the sentiments which he has already declared), to meet any disposition to negotiate on the part of the enemy, with an earnest desire to give it the fullest and...
Page 134 - Let us, said he, make relief in cases where there are a number of children, a matter of right and an honour, instead of a ground for opprobrium and contempt. This will make a large family a blessing, and not a curse ; and this will draw a proper line of distinction between those who are able to provide for themselves by their labour, and those who, after having enriched their country with a number of children, have a claim • upon its assistance for their support.
Page 461 - THIS BOOK. FORMS PART OF THE ORIGINAL LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BOUGHT IN EUROPE 1838 TO 1839 BY ASA CRAY a, >^ ^f-, LITERARY REMAINS OF TUB LATE WILLIAM HAZLITT.
Page 338 - I trust will never abandon us, and which has shone forth in the English character, by which we have preserved our existence and fame as a nation, which I trust we shall be determined never to abandon under any extremity, but shall join hand and heart in the solemn pledge that is proposed to us, and declare to his Majesty that we know great exertions are wanted; that we are prepared to make them; and are, at all events, determined to stand or fall by the Laws, Liberties, and Religion of our country...
Page 135 - Experience had already shewn how much could be done by the industry of children, and the advantages of early. employing them in such branches of manufactures as they are capable to execute.
Page 422 - Majesty's navy: at the same time intimating, that, as the present alarming situation of the country made it necessary that this measure should be passed without any delay, he should wish that the bill might this day proceed through its different stages, with a suitable pause at each, if required, and that it should be sent to the Lords for their concurrence.
Page 183 - Gentlemen ; it is a peculiar satisfaction to me, in the present conjuncture of affairs, to recur to your advice, after the recent opportunity which has been given for collecting the...

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