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A

CONCISE DESCRIPTION

OF THE

ENDOWED GRAMMAR SCHOOLS

IN

ENGLAND AND WALES;

ORNAMENTED WITH ENGRAVINGS.

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BY

NICHOLAS CARLISLE, F. R. S., M. R. I. A.,

ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN TO HIS MAJESTY,

AND FELLOW AND SECRETARY OF THE SOCIETY OF
ANTIQUARIES OF LONDON.

VOL. II.

LONDON WALES.

Institutus liberaliter educatione doctrinâque puerili.

LONDON:

CICERO de Ora.

PRINTED FOR BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY,

PATERNOSTER-RO

BY W. BULMER AND CO., CLEVELAND-ROW, ST. JAMES'S.

1818.

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LONDON.

ALLHALLOWS BARKING,

in SEETHING LANE.

THE FREE GRAMMAR SCHOOL in Plough Yard, in the Parish of Allhallows Barking, was founded by Alderman JAMES HICKSON, who died on the 16th of June, 1689,for the education of 20 poor Children, viz., 14 from the Parish of Allhallows, and 6 from the Parish of St. John of Wapping, and endowed with £20. per annum for a Master, with a dwelling and two chaldrons of coals,—and £8. per annum to a Writing Master.

He also left several other charitable benefactions, for the performance of which he gave his Manor of "Williats," and certain other lands and tenements in the Parish of South Mims, in Middlesex, in Trust, to The Worshipful Company of BREWERS of London, in whom the nomination of both Masters is vested, and the election of Scholars into the School.

The number upon the Foundation is always full and about 20 other Scholars attend.

The Eron Grammars are used.

There are no Exhibitions, nor other University advantages, belonging to this School.

The present Master is, The Revd. WILLIAM VALENTINE IRESON, M. A., late of Emanuel College, Cambridge, who has presided upwards of THIRTY-SIX years. This Gentleman has ceased to take Boarders.

VOL. II.

B

THE CHARTER HOUSE.

THE Site upon which this celebrated Foundation stands. was anciently part of the estates of THE HOSPITAL of ST. JOHN OF JERUSALEM, and consisted of Ten acres two roods and thirty-three perches.

Sir WALTER de MANY, of Hainault, one of the first Knights of the Garter, and who had served with great honour in King EDWARD the Third's war against France, purchased it, in the year 1319, of The Knights of St. John, for the pious purpose of interring the dead after the dreadful plague, which, in that year, had visited the Metropolis.

Sir WALTER named the place" New Church Haw," and he built a Chapel on part of the ground, wherein STOWE relates, that "great and numerous oblations were made for many years after."

This Chapel was of stone, and stood about the centre of the area, now called " CHARTER-HOUSE-SQUARE," but it was removed before the year 1561, when Lord NORTH conveyed it to THOMAS COTTON, School-master, " for the good desyre and affecion that he beareth towards the vertuous educacion, and bringing up of yowthe in Learning." This grant was, however, only during pleasure, and rent free.

RALPH STRATFORD, Bishop of London, also purchased three acres contiguous to this place, which he likewise converted to a Burial ground, and inclosing it with a brick wall, erected a Chapel, and gave it the name of " Pardon Church-yard," where suicides and such as had been executed, were interred. These were brought in what was called a "Friar's Cart," which was tilted and covered with black, having a pendant Bell within, so that notice was given as it passed along, of the kind of burden which it contained. The site of this ground was immediately opposite to the

present Kitchen-garden of The Charter House, and behind the houses in Wilderness-Row.

About the year 1360, Sir WALTER conceived the design of founding a College upon this site, for a Dean and Twelve Secular Priests. But, he was diverted from his plan by MICHAEL de NORTHBURGH, then Bishop of London, who purchased the whole Cemetery of him, and founded there a Convent of Carthusians, in 1361. Sir WALTER was, however, induced to unite with the Bishop for building and endowing the Priory for Twenty-four Monks; and the munificence of his fortune and patronage probably secured to his fame the honour of the Foundation, of which the Bishop had not been able to deprive him. The pious Knight having augmented and established it with a suitable revenue, King EDWARD the Third granted his Charter in 1371; and the foundation was recited to be in Honour of God and The Virgin Mary, by the appellation of "The Salutation of The Mother of God." This Charter is preserved among the records of the present Hospital.

"The Chartreux," the name which Sir WALTER adopted, was derived from the place where BRUNO, the first Carthusian Monk, retired from the world, and founded this Order in France. It was situate upon a steep rock in a desert, about five leagues from Grenoble and has given rise to many similar, though inferior foundations in different countries, preserving at the same time it's own pre-eminence by the name of " The Grand Chartreux.”

Of the ancient foundation in London little remains at present. But, in an ancient Tower, is a room which is now used to preserve the Archives of The Hospital; the Ceiling whereof is beautifully ribbed, and the centre stone represents a large rose, inclosing the letters I. H. S., or Jesus Hominum Salvator. This room is guarded from every accident by depredation, fire, or damp, and the Records are placed in the greatest regularity and order. To this depository

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