A Silver Key to a Golden Palace: A Medley

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G. Routledge and Sons, 1881 - 143 pages
 

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Page 129 - Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on ; and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.
Page 3 - I have a garden of my own, But so with roses overgrown, And lilies, that you would it guess To be a little wilderness ; And all the springtime of the year It only loved to be there. Among the beds of lilies, I Have sought it oft, where it should lie, Yet could not till itself would rise, Find it, although before mine eyes ; For, in the flaxen lilies' shade, It like a bank of lilies laid.
Page 45 - Lady-bird ! lady-bird ! fly away home ; — The field-mouse has gone to her nest, The daisies have shut up their sleepy red eyes, And the bees and the birds are at rest. Lady-bird ! lady-bird ! fly away home...
Page 135 - A LITTLE fairy comes at night, Her eyes are blue, her hair is brown, With silver spots upon her wings, And from the moon she flutters down. She has a little silver wand, And when a good child goes to bed She waves her hand from right to left, And makes a circle round its head. And then it dreams of pleasant things, Of fountains filled with fairy fish, And trees that bear delicious fruit, And bow their branches at a wish: Of...
Page 135 - She waves her wand from right to left, And makes a circle round its head. ' And then it dreams of pleasant things, Of fountains filled with fairy fish, And trees that bear delicious fruit, And bow their branches at a...
Page 136 - SOME dreams we have are nothing else but dreams, Unnatural and full of contradictions ; Yet others of our most romantic schemes Are something more than fictions. It might be only on enchanted ground ; It might be merely by a thought's expansion ; But in the spirit, or the flesh, I found An old deserted mansion. A residence for woman, child, and man, A dwelling-place, — and yet no habitation ; A house, — but under some prodigious...
Page 14 - OH, who would keep a little bird confined, When cowslip bells are nodding in the wind ; When every hedge as with " good morrow " rings, And, heard from wood to coombe, the blackbird sings ! Oh ! who would keep a little bird confined In his cold wiry prison ? Let him fly, And hear him sing : How sweet is liberty ! THE DUTIFUL CHILD READING THE STORY OF JOSEPH TO A SICK FATHER.
Page 143 - Discoveries and Inventions of the Nineteenth Century," " Science in Sport," &c. With many Original Illustrations, Portraits, and 16 pages of Plates. %* An entirely Original Work of great importance, on which the author has been engaged for the last three years.

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