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Published by Messrs. Longmans and Co., London.

LATIN PROSE EXERCISES: Consist

ing of English sentences translated from Cæsar, Cicero, and Livy, to be retranslated into the original Latin. New Edition. 12mo. 38, 6d.

THESE Exercises consist of English sentences translated from Cæsar, Cicero, and Livy, to be retranslated into the original Latin. The Latin words to be used are given, as in Ellis' Exercises, on the opposite page. The Exercises are arranged according to the Rules of Dr. Kennedy's Syntax, but are perfectly adapted for general use. The easier sentences are suitable for beginners : more difficult ones are subjoined under each rule. The Second and Third Parts contain simple Exercises on the Subjunctive Mood, and the use of Conjunctions. This work will, it is believed, be found to supply useful vivá voce lessons for students too advanced to spend their time in writing out the Exercises. In the later Editions some errors have been corrected, and a few pages of Elementary Exercises, intended for the use of the merest beginners, have been added at the end of the book.

“ The grammar upon the rules of which Mr. Bradley's selection is based is that of Dr. Kennedy, which is, in our judgment, a vast improvement upon the older Eton manual. The selection has been made with great care, and evidently with an experimental knowledge of a beginner's difficulties. In the matter of note-making a very judicious course has been taken. Instead of explaining at the foot of the page any particular difficulties which may arise, reference is made to a valuable Appendix, in which the Author has allowed himself space to clear up the whole question. The Notes, therefore, may be almost

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regarded as a supplementary grammar. Great pains have been bestowed upon this part of the book, and there is abundant evidence of this being the product of mature and trustworthy scholarship."-Papers for the Schoolmaster.

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KEY TO LATIN EXERCISES: Con

sisting of Extracts from the Writings of Cæsar, Cicero, and Livy; with References to the Original Authors. [This Key is published for the use of those engaged in tuition, and cannot be supplied without the Author's sanction. Address to him at 101, Marina, St. Leonard's-on-Sea, or under cover to the Publishers, Paternoster Row, London.] 12mo. 5s.

LESSONS IN LATIN PROSE: Consist

ing of Rules and Exercises, and forming an Easy Introduction to the Writing of Continuous Latin

Prose. Second Edition. 12mo. 5s. AMONG the numerous Latin Exercise-books which have of late years been offered to the public, the present one will be found in some respects sui generis. It is well known that the translation of detached English sentences will never enable a boy to write good continuous Latin prose. He can only attain this art by the translation of connected sentences and of paragraphs. In the present work the Author has attempted to supply an easier introduction to continuous Latin prose-writing than any he has yet met with. From an experimental knowledge of the difficulties of young scholars, he has also aimed throughout at more than usual simplicity and clearness, often sacrificing brevity to attain this end. The book however is progressive in its character, and the latter part will require a good acquaintance with the vocabulary and structure of the Latin language.

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The book is divided into four parts. The first, of an extremely easy character, is on the tenses of the indicative moods, gerunds, supines, infinitive, and participles. The second part is mainly on the subjunctive mood—the use of which has been studiously excluded from the Exercises in the first part. Much labour has been bestowed on the attempt to make this difficult subject clear to the comprehension of beginners. The third part contains Rules on miscellaneous subjects, illustrated by paragraphs of a tolerably easy but varied character, adapted for translation. The fourth part treats of several points concerning tenses, moods, and conjunctions, which were passed over as too difficult for the earlier portion of the work. In the concluding Lessons the important subjects, already touched upon in the second part, of The Dependent Question and Oratio Obliqua are illustrated at greater length.

It is hoped that this book will not only be found useful in the middle forms of our larger schools, but that it will in an especial degree prove an acceptable help to that large class of tutors, who are preparing backward pupils to write a decent piece of Latin prose, previously to their entering at the University, or undergoing an examination for the Army or Civil Service. In such cases there is no time to commence again from the beginning, and paragraphs of ordinary English are much beyond the pupil's powers. System moreover is wanted, and the question is, What is to be done? This work, it is hoped, may to some extent solve the difficulty.

KEY TO LESSONS IN LATIN PROSE.

This Key is published for the use of those engaged in tuition, and cannot be supplied without the Author's sanction. Address to him at 101, Marina, St. Leonard'son-Sea, or under cover to the Publishers, Paternoster Row, London. 12mo. 5s. 6d.

TROY TAKEN;

BEING THE

SECOND BOOK OF VIRGIL'S ÆNEID,

WITH NOTES ADAPTED

TO THE USE OF

JUNIOR AND MIDDLE FORMS.

BY

W. W. BRADLEY, M, A.,

LATE DEMY OF MAGDALEN COLLEGE, OXFORD.

SECOND EDITION.

:

LONDON:
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND ROBERTS.
RUGBY : CROSSLEY AND BILLINGTON.

1864.

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