Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1997 - Reference - 625 pages

This scientific detective story is the first book which explains clearly the science used by paleontologists, and the new, cutting-edge techniques that led to the discovery of Seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur yet known--and possibly the largest land animal to have ever lived. Gillette's first-person account of the project answers the most frequently asked questions about Seismosaurus: How was it discovered? How do we know it is a new species? How did it die? Part catalogue of the workings of paleontological science in the 1990s, the book also illustrates the exciting collaboration between Gillette, the chemists and physicists who helped to reconstruct Seismosaurus.

 

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Contents

Quotations by Subject
1
AdulthoodAdult Development
8
The Seventies
14
Hats
22
Anticipation
24
Attack
37
Brain
55
Candor
60
Majority
300
Masses
306
Menopause
312
Sexism
314
Names
329
New York City
335
193
342
Opportunities
348

Christmas
73
Taste
74
Complacency
86
Cosmetics
94
Dandies and Dandyism
107
Depression 1930s
120
Dreams and Dreaming
132
English Language
146
Extremism
159
Farmers and Farming
167
Ford Gerald
180
Genius
193
59
199
Greece and the Greeks
206
Heartbreak
214
Housework
227
Impotence
240
New Year
252
Intelligibility
253
Kennedy Family
266
191
288
Loss
289
194
365
Physics
366
Political Correctness
377
Vocation
381
Portraits
383
Precedent
389
Promised Land
396
Punishment Corporal
402
Reading
408
Sacrifices
427
Sensuality
440
Sexual Harassment
442
Sundays
471
Taxes
475
The 1920s
491
206
494
159
502
Voting
505
Women and
524
Youth and
537
Index of Key Words
567
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

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