The Popular History of England: An Illustrated History of Society and Government from the Earliest Period to Our Own Times, Volume 6

Front Cover
Estes and Lauriat, 1874 - Great Britain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 343 - He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.
Page 354 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation.
Page 313 - When this child of ours wishes to assimilate to its parent, and to reflect with a true filial resemblance the beauteous countenance of British liberty, are we to turn to them the shameful parts of our constitution ? are we to give them our weakness for their strength, our opprobrium for their glory; and the slough of slavery, which we are not able to work off, to serve them for their freedom?
Page 434 - Filling a glass, he turned to them and said, "with a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 342 - He has endeavoured to prevent the Population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.
Page 252 - I am one who will lift up my hands against it. In such a cause, your success would be hazardous. America, if she fell, would fall like the strong man. She would embrace the pillars of the state, and pull down the constitution along with her.
Page 319 - If this state of his country had been foretold to him, would it not require all the sanguine credulity of youth, and all the fervid glow of enthusiasm, to make him believe it? Fortunate man, he has lived to see it ! Fortunate indeed, if he lives to see nothing that shall vary the prospect, and cloud the setting of his day ! Excuse me, sir, if, turning from such thoughts, I resume this comparative view once more.
Page 319 - England, the genius should point out to him a little speck, scarce visible in the mass of the national interest, a small seminal principle rather than a formed body...
Page 376 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 277 - Power without right is the most odious and detestable object that can be offered to the human imagination. It is not only pernicious to those who are subject to it, but tends to its own destruction. It is what my noble friend (Lord Lyttleton) has truly described it,

Bibliographic information